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In reply to: michaelirish on Monday 17/04/06 06:10pm

Go for it Mike from Ireland my man - I'm back from a 3 weeker camping trip ....very depressing as I cirled & meandered some of the best wine areas of Ozi. Was able to post a couple via the laptop/CDMA Wireless 3G (very little EVDO broadband where I was though so had to put up with the sluggish 1x) Anyway a little break from TLS hasn't hurt me.

I see Looking Confident has been active with plenty of text there, good one LC.

Yep FatProfits have been bullish on TLS for some time now. The Intelligent Investor has a Long Term Buy on it too.

Anyway a small spike for TLS today looks better.

So no point in ramping for the stock you all know my position - Great Long Term Investment for those with the courage to ignore the herdal gossip which is a contagious disease by the way. http://www.sharescene.com/html/emoticons/laughingsmiley.gif dawno

 

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Article from The Australian

 

Let's go Dutch and get up to speed

double click | David Frith

APRIL 18, 2006

 

JUST how poverty stricken this country is in broadband internet access was displayed at a recent Sydney event, and DoubleClick is pleased to say Communications and Information Technology Minister Helen Coonan was present to witness the national humiliation.

 

Let's hope she has passed the message on to Telstra chief executive Sol Trujillo.

Telecommunications industry analyst Paul Budde had arranged a Netherlands-Australia round table discussion on broadband issues by industry and government and Senator Coonan represented the federal Government.

 

The Dutch team included the country's Prime Minister as well as a team of ministers and officials involved in broadband matters.

 

What a tale they had to tell.

 

The Netherlands is a country of 16 million people, but has a communications system to die for.

 

The Amsterdam Internet Exchange is the digital gateway to Europe, having 30,000TB of data racing through its switches each month.

 

The country is criss-crossed by electronic "grids" linking thousands of ordinary computers into powerful supercomputing complexes. Among the things it makes possible is a sophisticated home healthcare service for the aged, with electronic sensors and video advice.

 

After South Korea, the Netherlands has the second-highest rate of broadband connections in the world.

 

About 25 of 100 South Koreans and 22 of 100 Dutch folk have access to full-scale broadband, whereas Australia is below the OECD average with about 10 in 100 people connected.

 

In fact, we're probably a good deal worse than that, depending on how you define "broadband", which Dutch officials say means in their country that a service must operate at 1Mbps at least.

 

Here, Telstra and other providers shamelessly promote 256Kbps as "broadband".

 

The fastest service offered by Telstra's BigPond is 1.5Mbps but it's so expensive at up to $130 a month that relatively few use it.

 

Late last year, Trujillo outlined a plan to build, by 2009, a network offering speeds "greater than 12Mbps" that would involve new fibre-optic cabling from exchanges to "nodes" in suburban streets and some regional areas. Ordinary old copper wire would continue to carry signals between these nodes and individual houses and offices.

 

But since then, the plan has been repeatedly shelved and trotted out again, as Trujillo and the Government bicker over regulatory issues.

 

Meanwhile, the Dutch are getting on with it, building a network in Amsterdam, where fibre cabling goes right into every home, at no cost to the householder.

 

Data will flow up and down that pipeline at up to 100Mbps, opening up a world of services, including high-definition video.

 

When can we expect 100Mbps services in Australia? Possibly never, because cabling a country as widespread as this would be a daunting prospect.

 

Telstra could be offering millions of BigPond users up to 24Mbps connections right now, but chooses not to.

 

It has the equipment in thousands of its exchanges to offer ADSL2+ over present copper phone lines and move data at up to 24Mbps, although the speed drops off with distance from an exchange. For mysterious reasons, this service is not being offered to the public, leaving the 1.5Mbps service its fastest.

 

Meanwhile, competitors are jumping in.

 

Adelaide's Internode and Adam Internet and Western Australia's iiNet are among a handful that have their own gear installed in some Telstra exchanges and are offering ADSL2+ already.

 

Prices start at about $35 a month and go up to $70-$80, less in many cases than BigPond charges for its much slower services.

 

BigPond is being outclassed on its own territory.

 

Trujillo should get ADSL2+ services operating immediately and get on with organising the new fibre-network because the sooner we get up to speed with the Dutch, the better.

 

APPLE Computer is reported to be close to launching all-new Intel-powered notebook Macs for the consumer, small business and education markets.

 

The new models, expected late this month or early next, will be dubbed "MacBooks" rather than iBooks, the moniker used for present models for this market.

 

Internet reports say the new models will have at least 1.67GHz Core Duo chips and 13in screens.

 

They will be much cheaper than the already-released MacBook Pro notebooks, which have 15in screens and are aimed at the professional market.

 

dfrith@gmail.com

 

The Australian

 

 

 

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In reply to: flashnick on Thursday 20/04/06 11:16pm

Interesting and accurate article, Flash.

 

What is not delved into is why Telstra would not offer ADSL2 right now, because as the article say, Telstra already has the equipment in most exchanges. The answer (again) is the regulatory regime. As soon as Telstra offers a retail product, its competitors can ask the ACCC to 'declare' the product and have access at 'wholesale' prices. Fair enough, but unfortunately there has been a history of the ACCC specifying a wholesale price that is below Telstra's cost! Therefore, Telstra shareholders are directly subsidising (often foreign and larger) companies.

 

No wonder Telstra is not investing! The directors could be the subject of a class action if they deliberately signed off on a proposal that had the obvious and direct effect of shifting equity out of the company into its competitors coffers.

 

As I've mentioned before, I believe the PM is now involved and the breakthough will come. With the right regulatory setting, I think Telstra's SP will look after itself.

 

goldi

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In reply to: flashnick on Thursday 20/04/06 11:16pm

Hi Flaashnik - reading between the lines then it seems a political stand off is what the main detractor is to Ozi getting the best out of broadband services. TLS seems to not want to budge until it gets some favourable end to the regulation restrictions.

In actual fact this is what is being played out presently it would seem between TLS & the Gov + regulations brought about by the ACCC.

It is a game that is being played & at some stage there will need to be a resolution to it all.

I believe that because the Fed Gov needs to get TLS 3 off its plate at some sort of satisfactory sale price the only card to play to deliver this would be to agree to some sort of TLS favourable resolution outcome for a win / win result otherwise where will they go from here.

Interesting times but my money must go to a favourable TLS outcome in the end or it will remain a stalemate. In fact I'm very confidednt that will be the case. I think Sol has

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In reply to: flashnick on Thursday 20/04/06 11:16pm

Hi Flaashnik - reading between the lines then it seems a political stand off is what the main detractor is to Ozi getting the best out of broadband services. TLS seems to not want to budge until it gets some favourable end to the regulation restrictions.

In actual fact this is what is being played out presently it would seem between TLS & the Gov + regulations brought about by the ACCC.

It is a game that is being played & at some stage there will need to be a resolution to it all.

I believe that because the Fed Gov needs to get TLS 3 off its plate at some sort of satisfactory sale price the only card to play to deliver this would be to agree to some sort of TLS favourable resolution outcome for a win / win result otherwise where will they go from here.

Interesting times but my money must go to a favourable TLS outcome in the end or it will remain a stalemate. In fact I'm very confidednt that will be the case. I think Sol has taken it right up to them very early in the game knowing that to be the main obstacle.

dawno http://www.sharescene.com/html/emoticons/smile.gif

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In reply to: dawno on Friday 21/04/06 01:02am

Hi guys.

 

 

So TLS is to blame for our poor broadband speed.

 

I have news.

 

It is the crippling regulatory regime.

ATM once TLS does anything innovative the LOW TO GROUND CHERRY_PICKERS get it 'declared' and hey presto they have access.

 

Our gentlemen CEOs 'lived' with that environment and promised the earth and rapidly lost ccredability.

 

SOL comes and calls a spade a spade and hey presto the present mexican(soory SOL) with the Gov.

 

FTTN is way to achieve Holland standards in BB speed.

 

This can only come with regulatory surety.

 

The ripe fruit will then be too high for the LOW TO GROUND CHERRY_PICKERS

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I do not hold TLS long or short at this stage, but for those interested it is showing triple bullish divergence on Macd weekly, which according to Elder is one of the most powerful TA signals. To me they are the same as all TA signals some work some dont, but I do look for bullish divergences on Macd weekly.

It does not mean that it will reverse its down trend, but at least may have a reasonable rally????

Note as share price drops to new lows Macd weekly makes a higher low(bullish divergence)

 

It may play out it may not? time will tell.

 

Cheers

post-16-1145589161.gif

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Thanks for your input again Goldi. Dawno

The REAL ISSUE that gets overlooked is that TLS really should not hold the economic wellbeing of the country to ransom because it wants to appease shareholders. No Matter what the reason - because THIS affects all shareholders of ALL COMPANIES.

 

Ill say this again;- Australia is Economically disadvantaged by "the tyranny of distance". We are well off the major trade routes in the world. (Basic High school geography if you doubt what I am saying here) Broadband is the most Effective interactive communications medium mankind has ever had access to. It ELIMINATES distance barriers.

If you have no experience of how this works maybe you should look no further than how most of us trade shares let alone see how differently Large companies can now work due to video conferencing and the ability monitor their overseas production facilities, and ADVERTISE to a GLOBAL AUDIENCE and on it goes.

 

The copper/broadband network should either be a National utility which provides for the needs of business and individuals, or a well run business that competes just like any capitalist venture.

It appears that TLS can not be either because of its History, Culture and "all the baggage"

 

One could argue that it should never have been sold as is because it is doomed to be pillaged because it has an existing network most Australians feel they have already paid for over and over and it owes them. (Remember this company was voted in the 80s to be AustraliaÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s most hated company - then they sold shares in it -and - who said money cant buy love???)

 

However start from scratch provide a private company type service with excellent quality and IÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢m sure it would be a goer - because then they would not be obliged to share all their hard work with the competition.

 

Then there is the...... cost - well so much for dreams of utopia.

But you get my drift.

 

Kes

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