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Saw Bill and Melinda Gates interviewed last night on TV. I thought it was curious for them to be suddenly gaining media attention at this juncture of the RNAi patent thicket. What stood out for me was when the interviewer asked him why not cancer, the reply was because with just $50m he becomes the biggest and ergo probably the most powerful sponsors in diseases that kill more people than cancer every year.

 

I recall once, many years ago now, he took the podium at the UN and declared that one day there will be a cure for HIV. A year or two later BLT ran in to all of their trouble.

 

I also recall him being the largest individual shareholder (not largest shareholder) in MRK at the time of the takeover bid from MRK for BLT which was shortly after the Sirna bid. While everyone condemns the Sirna buy nobody mentions that it was one half of a pincer movement and had they succeeded the story would be very different.

 

And some time ago, I saw he made a deal with PFE on the Ann Arbor site. I don't know if that is where he intends to site a project team or if it was part of a wider deal but the mere fact he is striking terms with PFE is relevant.

 

Wiz you are quite right.

 

If we go back and check out the sequence of different events we can see in Jan. CSIRO stikes a deal and converts to equity taking back ag. and vet on the patent. We can be sure PFE was a party to these negotiations. Feb. as you say, PFE endorses BLT through Tacere. In late March SM leaves and only after Japan issues on the key part of the 099. April we have La Jolla come on board.

 

Looks to me as if the deal was done in Jan. Closed at the end of March and La Jolla have been keeping them dead in the water until everything else is put in to place whatever that may include. I am convinced the Hillary visit is a part of it as is the patent issue.

 

Lets hope they decide to lift this weight off us before Xmas so we can party like its 1999.

 

 

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Gene therapy trial approved

4:46pm Wednesday 10th November 2010

GENE therapy company Oxford Biomedica has received approval from US regulators to test its eye disease treatment on 18 patients.

 

The company, based at Oxford Science Park, uses an equine virus to deliver genes to the retina in the hope of repairing damage from age-related macular degeneration, a major cause of blindness.

 

The treatment, called RetinoStat, was designed using the company's patented LentiVector gene-delivery technology, and is one of four treatments being developed in partnership with pharmaceutical giant Sanofi-aventis.

 

The trial at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, led by Prof Peter Campochiaro, will evaluate three dose levels and assess safety, aspects of visual acuity and ocular physiology. It is hoped to start by the end of December.

 

Age-related macular degeneration is a major cause of blindness affecting an estimated 25 to 30 million people worldwide and is expected to triple by 2025.

 

RetinoStat aims to preserve and improve the vision of patients through blocking the formation of new blood vessels. Lab tests suggests patients will only need a single dose, while current treatments often require frequent, repeated administration.

 

Chief executive John Dawson said: ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“This is a significant milestone for Oxford BioMedica and is a result of the outstanding effort from our research and development and regulatory teams."

 

It is the first US clinical study to directly administer this type of treatment to patients, and he said the approval boosted hopes for the company's ParkinsonÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s disease product, ProSavin.

 

He added: "Together with our partner, Sanofi-aventis, we look forward to progressing all four of our gene-based ocular products into clinical development by the end of 2011.ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ÂÂ

 

The loss-making company, an Oxford University spin-out, had ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚£13.7m cash at the end of September, compared with ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚£16.3m in June. Its hopes are pinned on meeting development milestones triggering payments from its commercial partners over the next 12-18 months

 

 

http://www.oxfordbiomedica.co.uk/userfiles/image/pipeline/20100319.jpg

 

 

From what i have read the whole pipeline will need to go through the Benitec Toll gate, AND since Sanofi and Pfizer have a vested interest, the bidding should be nice an colorful.

 

 

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I used to be an Oxford Biomedica shareholder.

 

Their Lentivector technology is important as an RNAi delivery technology. However, the company is a classical "biotech" rather than a new generation "bio-engineering" company. Hence, they failed to emphasize RNAi technologies.

 

Their flagship oncology compound, Trovax (or something like that), failed.

 

A capable company - let down by a lack of vision at the senior management level.

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Some that senior management team ended up in Dicerna. I hope the same does not bode for them.

 

Is this guy dropping a hint or what? If I were to dream a dream it would be M&A with differentiation by disease state, technology and different phases of the PDLC with forward integration on to the NAZ and pharma partnership for money and marketing. All with interlocking shareholdings.

 

http://www.biotechnologynews.net/storyview...ectionsource=s0

 

Fuller gave BTN his take on AustraliaÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s industry and investor reluctance to put cash into biotech.

 

ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“I think that Australia is amazing in that the companies here have worked to do a lot with very little,ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ he said.

 

However, he believes the countryÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s industry is in a plateau phase and is struggling from a lack of funding.

 

In the US, early rounds of investment can attract $50-100 million in support.

 

Here in Australia, the amounts raised are more in the order of $5-10 million.

 

ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“Just on that basis alone, we are struggling for lack of funds and I think that creates some interesting dynamics.ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ÂÂ

 

Australia is delivers great research and, per head of capita, the country has one of the most productive outputs for highest medical and scientific research, he noted.

 

The countryÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s biotechnology industry is yet to experience a transformational event though, Fuller argued.

 

In the US, big success stories such as Genzyme, Genentec, Biogenidec and Amgen have changed the investment dynamic.

 

ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“Australia has not really had that transformational event yet, and I think that is what we need,ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ he said.

 

A transformation event would encourage local investment.

 

ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“We need something to bring attention to biotech so that people could say ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¹Ãƒƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã¢â‚¬Å“maybe we should really be investing in that, rather than digging iron ore, coal, whatever, out of the groundÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢.ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ÂÂ

 

The Australian bias towards resources means that the country does not yet have the depth of expertise or critical mass among its retail investors, he notes.

 

A transformation event would generate the attention Australia deserves.

 

ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“We have got all the right ingredients ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¦ [but] that magic element of serendipity has not quite struck yet, where we have a huge success story.ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ÂÂ

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