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China to further cut rare earth export quotas

Reuters 11:35 AM, 19 Oct 2010

BEIJING - China will further cut export quotas for rare earth metals next year by up to 30 per cent to protect the resource from over-exploitation, China Daily reported, quoting an unnamed official with the Ministry of Commerce.

China has been steadily reducing export quotas since 2005 for rare earth elements, which consist of 17 metals used in crucial new green technologies such as hybrid cars and wind turbines as well as in mobile phones and missile guidance systems.

The policy has raised alarm among countries with industries reliant on the minerals for high-tech and military applications.

The ministry official said that China's reserves of medium and heavy rare earths might run dry within 15 to 20 years if the current rate of production is maintained, the paper said.

China, which accounts for more than 90 per cent of the world's total production of rare earth, has cut its export quotas this year by 40 per cent from 2009 levels, Chinese media have reported.

http://www.businessspectator.com.au/bs.nsf...ent&src=rab

 

 

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This was posted on HC by Zepplin, so credit is due to Zepplin - I'm merely reposting it here with his OK.

 

But it looks like a very carefully done calculation, based on very conservative estimates (eg basket price of $50, when it has already risen to about $60).

 

Given the hype around this stock at the moment, I thought it would be timely to carry out a Net Present Value (NPV) analysis for this stock.

 

My analysis reveals a NPV of $3.29 per share at a 12% discount rate

 

I have made the following assumptions

 

- The basket price of Lynas's REE remains at US$50/t until the end of 2012, by which time the light REE fall in price by 20% and remain at this price until the end of the project. It is assumed that heavy REE remain at the same price for the life of the project.

 

- The company has 17,490,000 tonnes of reserves at an average grade of 8.1%. This is derived from the Duncan Deposit (7.6m tonnes at 4.8%) and the Central Lanthanide Deposit (9.88m tonnes at 10.7%)

 

- The AUD/USD exchange rate is 1:1 until the end of 2012, by which time it remains at 0.80AUD/USD for the remainder of the mine life

 

- Production is 11K tonnes p.a, increasing to 22K tonnes p.a. by mid 2014

 

- Phase 2 expansion costs $120m and is entirely debt funded at a 10% interest rate

 

- Mine costs are $7.70/t, increasing by 2.5% p.a.

 

- Royalties are 5% ad volorum

 

- There are 1.65b shares on issue for the life of the project

 

- I have not considered the impact of LYC's holding of NTU or any other potential acquisitions

 

- LYC will have to pay corporate income tax in Australia based on the 'arm's length price' of the concentrate it ships to Malaysia. Determining the arm's length price for rare earth concentrate is quite difficult, given that the market is dominated by China. As such, I have not considered Australian corporate tax in my calculations. Presumably the company will have carried forward losses anyway

 

- LYC has a 10 year tax holiday in Malaysia. I have not considered what tax would be payable after this period. At any rate, the Present Value cost of this tax would be minimal.

 

- Corporate overheads are $5m p.a.

 

- I have assumed that all capital expenditures are non recoverable sunk costs

 

I hope this helps to cut through the hype, as always DYOR

 

cheers

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This is copyright from the Financial Times, to acknowledge the source

 

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/6ad460d4-df93-11...144feabdc0.html

 

==== START QUOTE ====

 

Japan cries foul over rare earths

 

By FT Reporters

 

Published: October 24 2010 22:15 | Last updated: October 24 2010 22:15

 

The spat between China and Japan about supplies of so-called rare earth minerals ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã¢â‚¬Å“ vital commodities used in high-tech goods from computers to electric cars ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã¢â‚¬Å“ is more than just a diplomatic clash.

 

Driving the dispute is BeijingÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s ambition to use tough export limits on these commodities as leverage to encourage foreign companies to relocate production lines to China.

 

Global concerns about ChinaÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s dominance of rare earth production have grown rapidly following, what Tokyo says, has been a near halt to shipments to Japan. Purchasers in Europe and the US say they are still getting shipments, albeit slowly. Each side tells a different version of the story: Beijing has officially denied the embargo to Japan and says heavy export quota cuts, imposed earlier this year, mark an effort to conserve resources.

 

But Chinese officials and western executives say quota cuts are part of a strategy intended to boost development of its domestic manufacturing industry by trading ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“resources for technologyÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ÂÂ.

 

The quotas create a powerful incentive to foreign companies to transfer production to China-based joint ventures because they only apply to the raw rare earths, not processed forms of the commodity, such as rare earth-made magnets.

 

Executives say that even more important than the quotas are a myriad Chinese tax breaks: an export duty of 25 per cent and a 17 per cent VAT rebate means that rare earth prices are much lower in China than overseas, enticing companies to relocate to China.

 

ChinaÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology has championed a policy to restructure the rare earths sector, ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“partly by controlling export volumesÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ÂÂ, says Damien Ma of consultants Eurasia Group.

 

According to this plan, by 2015, China should maintain an annual export level of around 35,000 tonnes of rare earth metals ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã¢â‚¬Å“ compared with this yearÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s quota of about 30,000 tonnes. It will be producing 130,000-150,000 tonnes, and have a domestic processing capacity of 120,000-150,000 tonnes.

 

 

ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“Instead of exporting purely unprocessed rare earths, the intention is to consolidate production and create more value-added applied materials that contain rare earths by keeping a crucial link of the supply chain in-country,ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ says Mr Ma.

 

The strategy is seen by some Japanese officials and executives as posing a serious threat to TokyoÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s technology leadership in the use of rare earths. ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“Clearly China wants the core technologies,ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ says one Japanese official. ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“ItÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s a new kind of mercantilism.ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ÂÂ

 

ChinaÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s policy is causing concern at some Japanese producers.

 

TDK, one of the worldÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s largest producers of magnetic motors used in computer hard disk drives, hybrid cars and industrial robots, sees pressure to transfer production and technology. TDKÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s techniques are a closely guarded secret, and advanced stages of the process are carried out only at its facilities in Japan.

 

Executives and analysts say Japan, which does not mine rare earths domestically, would have no other option but to accommodate some of BeijingÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s demands and relocate at least some production plants to China.

 

But executives from some western countries are sanguine and downplay TokyoÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s concerns. Rhodia Group of France and Neo Material Technologies of Canada, both market leaders, opened factories in China in the last decade. Japanese companies such as Daido Electronics, a magnets producer, have also built plants in China.

 

Constantine Karayannopoulos, chief executive of Neo Material Technologies, estimates that more than half of Chinese rare earth demand is ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“actually consumed by Japanese, and to a lesser extent, South Korean, European and American companies, with plants inside the countryÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ÂÂ. China produces about 95 per cent of the worldÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s rare earth output, but it also accounts for around 65 per cent of global demandÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã¢â‚¬Å“ although almost all of it is later re-exported by manufacturers. Japan consumes around 20 per cent of the worldÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s output, with the rest roughly split between Europe and the US.

 

ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“The picture is not as bad as it seems on the surface because materials, components and finished products containing rare earths can be exported without export quotas,ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ says Mr Karayannopoulos.

 

Rhodia says it ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“has not experienced any issueÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ with rare earth shipments.

 

Moreover, over the long-term, ChinaÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s strategy of using quotas to develop its domestic industry could backfire by facilitating the development of alternative mines in other countries or, more likely, industrial processes less reliant on rare earths, executives say.

 

Reporting by Mure Dickie, Jonathan Soble, Leslie Hook and Javier Blas

 

==== END QUOTE ====

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gadget is buying today =)

this is what ive been waiting for... kissed support today, lets see what it does at 3:50pm... ill jump in around then =)

good to see it close 1.50 ish.

stops 1.26

goodluck!!! =)

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i reckon this one is a falling knife

i was almost temped to buy in when it rally in the afternoon

 

now it is back down 7% , a long tail for the day means reversal , but a short tail for the day means more fall to come......so it does not look good

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From this afternoon's ABC News:

 

==== START QUOTE ====

China gets tough over rare earth minerals

 

By Bronwyn Herbert

 

Posted Wed Oct 27, 2010 4:00pm AEDT

 

China's dominance of a set of minerals, crucial to the electrical devices that drive the modern economy, is causing tension in the international community.

 

Rare earth minerals are essential in most modern day devices - iPods, flat screen TVs, hybrid cars and modern weapons.

 

A group of 17 elements, their name comes from the fact they are difficult to extract as opposed to their scarcity, and China's dominance in the market is creating geopolitical waves.

 

China supplies more than 90 per cent of the world's rare earths and recently cut its supply of the minerals to Japan, amid a bitter maritime spat that has caused widespread protests.

 

Mathew Kaleel, a director of H3 Global Advisers, an investment firm specialising in commodities, says rare earths are now being recognised as strategic minerals.

 

"The rare earth [minerals] themselves are not rare, the term is a bit of a misnomer. Their rarity comes from the fact there's not a lot of it in any one place," he said.

 

"They are required for the smart missile technology for example, a lot of the components that go into advanced computer equipment, whether its for civilian or military purposes, they need very small parts of these rare earth so they're things which are not substitutable.

 

"There's geopolitical issues, it's coming up at the G20, it came up at the IMF where China supposedly has restricted exports of rare earth.

 

"All of a sudden it's created these issues - Japan doesn't have access to rare earth from China, and with the price going up so much in the last month or two, it makes it quite profitable to start exploring for these rare earth."

 

Mr Kaleel says China's cuts to exports are creating widespread angst.

 

"China announced that it was cutting its quotas by about 70 per cent - now when you've got a country which controls 90 per cent of the global export market cutting those exports, you are effectively pulling out over 60 per cent of global supply of these really important components," he said.

 

"The Japanese can't make smart phones, smart missile technology, the components for wind farms and a lot of alternative technology."

 

There have also been reports, denied by China, that it also had halted some rare earth shipments to American companies.

 

White House spokesman Robert Gibbs says the US government was checking to see if this was the case.

 

"NSC has seen the reports and is monitoring to see whether something like that is happening and they continue to do so but I don't think there's any update past some of those reports from last week," he said.

 

"Obviously... they are important in the production of a whole host of things and obviously something that NEC and NSC will monitor."

 

China's former leader Deng Xiaoping once compared the minerals to his country to what oil is to the Middle East and analysts say China is not likely to let go of its tight grip on the minerals anytime soon.

 

==== END QUOTE ====

 

Link provided:

 

http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2010/10...?section=justin

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LYC got dumped from resistance, pulled back to its 61.8% zone + horizontal support, ahhh i had to buy yesterday... .. .. stops are set at 1.26, lets hope it doesnt go anywhere near that area.

 

Same goes for MND, kissed support today,,, had to buy.. lets hope it holds =)

 

as for IFL.. piece of @#$@#$ give me a signal!! currently sitting on my fingers. hold/sell?

who knows, price and volume will tell.

 

if LYC bounces from here, next stop appears to be 1.90-2.00

good luck!

post-1622-1288242230_thumb.jpg

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Hi Gadget,

 

Hope you dont mind,

I'm just wondering about the trade you have going here.

 

Your entry was around 20% below the high and your stop is about 20% under the closing price today.

That seems to me, a long way from the recent highs to place a stop.

Do you think it needs to go that far before you consider the trend busted ?

Would you normally risk 15-20% of your trade capital on initial stops ?

Also interested to know if you have a Risk/Reward parameter to your trading and if so, where would you position a sell target ??

 

Thanks, M

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