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FUTURE TECHNOLOGY


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Some interesting Infographic from Visualcapitalist looking into the future :blink:

 

A Timeline of Future Technology

 

Making predictions about future technology is both fun and notoriously difficult.

 

However, such predictions also serve a very practical purpose for investors and business leaders, since failing to adapt to changing industry paradigms can completely decimate a business venture, turning it into the next Blockbuster, Kodak, or Sears.

 

TodayÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s infographic from Futurism rounds up some of the most interesting predictions about the future, from trusted sources such as Scientific American and The National Academy of Sciences.

 

http://www.visualcapitalist.com/timeline-future-technology/

 

MACHINES, BIG AND SMALL

 

The confluence of robotics, artificial intelligence, and increasing levels of automation is a prevailing trend throughout the projected timeline of future technology.

 

In less than 10 years, we will be able to control machines based on eye movements, while ingesting nano-sized robots to repair injuries from within our bodies. Later on, itÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s also expected that the next wave of AI will be a reality: by 2036, predictive AI will be able to predict the near-future with impressive precision. Elections, weather, geopolitical events, and other dynamic systems will be analyzed in real-time using thousands or millions of data streams.

 

Even further down the line, human brains and machines will be continue to become closer to interfacing directly, creating all kinds of possibilities.

 

http://www.visualcapitalist.com/visualizin...ost-automation/

 

THE ENERGY REVOLUTION CONTINUES

 

If you think the current progress in clean energy is exciting ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã¢â‚¬Å“ wait until you see the technologies in the queue.

 

The future of battery technology will include carbon-breathing batteries that turn CO2 into generate electricity, as well as diamond-based ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“nuclear batteriesÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ that run off of nuclear waste.

 

Meanwhile, solar power will be even cheaper as cells operate at near 100% efficiency, and commercial fusion power will be available by 2044. Climate change will also be tackled by interesting techniques, such as geoengineering with calcite aerosols, and carbon sequestration.

 

http://www.visualcapitalist.com/future-battery-technology/

 

MORE ON FUTURE TECHNOLOGY

 

Want to see more bold predictions about the future of technology?

 

Check out the future of alternative energy, the military, or the futuristic tech that could be inside your home.

 

Lastly, check out some very speculative predictions about what the world could look like, 100 years from now

 

http://www.visualcapitalist.com/alternativ...sources-future/

 

http://www.visualcapitalist.com/future-of-...ary-technology/

 

http://www.visualcapitalist.com/interactiv...side-next-home/

 

http://www.visualcapitalist.com/prediction...0-years-future/

 

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The 'digital mine' is here as technology gallops ahead

ABC Rural

By Babs McHugh

Posted about 3 hours ago

extract

The so-called 'digital mine' is no longer a future prospect.

 

It is already well and truly a fixture of the Australian mining landscape, and operators large and small, from front-end mining companies to the service industries, are a vital cog in the extractive industries supply chain.

 

The mining and resources sectors have undergone more change in the past 10 years than in the past 100 years.

 

Terms such as real-time data capture, automation and autonomous vehicles, wearable technologies and digital-twinning are part of the mining and METS sector lexicon in the 21st century.

 

But as Australian mining races to be at the forefront of a global trend, there are concerns about not only workforce availability and skill sets, but the traditional approach to tertiary education that is not necessarily geared towards the requirements of modern mining needs and practices.

 

What is the 'digital mine'?

see link for full details including video of the Airobotics drone demonstration

http://www.abc.net.au/news/rural/2017-08-0...way-now/8786194

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Government stumbles out of the innovation slow lane with crowdfunding

You may have missed the news on Thursday that the government has introduced new equity crowdfunding legislation, which will enable businesses of all sizes (but mainly start-ups,) to raise funds off a multitude of investors via specialised online platforms.

 

It is the kind of news that would have been unveiled with a great deal of fanfare a couple of years ago, when Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull was spending $14.9 million to promote an "Ideas Boom" that attempted to bring the country along for a ride on his Innovation Agenda.

 

But these days the reality of tech-led innovation is treated very much like an embarrassing nuisance by a government that has retreated dramatically from its progressive tendencies.

 

The new laws will update and replace a half-baked initial plan from March, which excluded a huge proportion of the organisations that would want to use it, by insisting that only public companies could apply....

 

Read more: http://www.afr.com/technology/government-s...6#ixzz4shxCaf1G

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The Seven Deadly Sins of AI Predictions

A lot of AI researchers and pundits imagine that the world is already digital, and that simply introducing new AI systems will immediately trickle down to operational changes in the field, in the supply chain, on the factory floor, in the design of products.

 

Nothing could be further from the truth. Almost all innovations in robotics and AI take far, far, longer to be really widely deployed than people in the field and outside the field imagined.

Rodney Brooks is a former director of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at MIT and a founder of Rethink Robotics and iRobot

 

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/609048/t...ai-predictions/

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Science-Driven Innovation Can Reduce Wind Energy Costs by 50% by 2030

 

https://www.nrel.gov/news/program/2017/scie...nt-by-2030.html

 

With science driving wind-technology innovations, the unsubsidized cost of wind energy could drop to 50% of current levels, equivalent to $23 per megawatt-hour, by 2030, according to a report released by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).
(don't forget the DoE has a Republican chair)
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Second order effects

Consider a simple change in technology, the automated checkout, such as in Woolworths and Coles in Australia. Walmart started rolling out these automated checkouts in around 2010 at scale and the other major retailers started doing the same. The first-order effects were a loss of jobs of the people working the checkouts, and retailers reduced their costs. And if one major competitor does that, other competitors follow, otherwise their cost structure is out of line.

 

But what of the second-order effects? Chewing gum sales have lost 15% of their volume since the introduction of automated checkouts in the US. The checkouts have disrupted the business model of impulse purchases. People do not drive to the supermarket to buy chewing gum, but when you used to stand in those checkout lines, you would pick up some chewing gum. I think mobile phones have had a bit to do with it too, because you now do other things when youÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢re standing there.

 

.. In 1999, at the peak of the technology bubble, Warren Buffett was asked by a group of students why he doesnÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢t invest in technology. He said he could not predict where the internet was going but investing in a business like Wrigley will not be disrupted by technology. And look whatÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s happened. Wrigley sales had gone up for 50 years, every year, before this change happened.

 

 

 

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Artificial intelligence law firm aims to roll out in remote, low socio-economic communities

 

The people of Darwin can just about take the law into their own hands, with a new legal firm going lawyer-free.

 

The business will use an artificial intelligence (AI) system instead, with technology its developers say will revolutionise access to legal services.

 

Once where a lawyer may have sat behind a desk at the law firm, is a user-friendly system called Ailira, which is short for Artificially Intelligent Legal Information Resource Assistant.

 

read more - http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-11-13/arti...-darwin/9146332

 

The four industries making best use of artificial intelligence

Security

Finance

Marketing

Insurance

Read more: http://www.afr.com/leadership/the-four-ind...r#ixzz50I9XuYUb

 

What to look for when investing in Artificial Intelligence stocks

Artificial Intelligence (AI) stocks are under-valued and demand will rise as technologies such as autonomous vehicles becomes commonplace, says tech expert Marc Kennis.

https://stockhead.com.au/experts/future-aut...ai-says-expert/

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Rio Tinto aims for "intelligent" Australian iron ore mine

SYDNEY, Dec 4 (Reuters) ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã¢â‚¬Å“ Rio Tinto next year will seek board approval to develop an "intelligent" iron ore mine at a cost of $2.2 billion, fully incorporating technologies such as robotics and driverless trains and trucks on a single site, the company's head of iron ore said on Monday.

 

A feasibility study was underway to demonstrate the economics behind developing the Koodaideri mine in the Pilbara region of the state of Western Australia, said Chief Executive, Iron Ore Chris Salisbury.

http://www.mining.com/web/rio-tinto-aims-i...-iron-ore-mine/

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It was AI versus Warren Buffett.

 

The artificial intelligence was unleashed by Winton, the London hedge fund, to test an old principle of the Berkshire Hathaway chairman: that major acquisitions usually hurt the buyers' shareholders. Researchers collected and analysed data on almost 9,000 US deals back to the 1960s.

 

The result? Winton says Buffett's thesis doesn't hold up ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã¢â‚¬Å“ big acquisitions don't inherently destroy value.

 

"It prevented us from trading on a false signal and potentially losing money," said Daniel Mitchell, who runs a team of data scientists at the $US30 billion hedge fund. Buffett didn't respond to a request for comment sent to an assistant.

 

Bit by bit, AI is laying a claim to the future of investing after many false dawns going back decades. Giant money managers like Two Sigma and Goldman Sachs Group and smaller players like Schonfeld Strategic Advisors have adopted it as a cornerstone strategy or research tool.

 

From this foothold, how far will AI go?

 

Man Group Luke Ellis sees a slow takeover coming. The $US103.5 billion firm in London already devotes about $US13 billion to several hedge funds using machine learning. In 10 years, it will play a role in everything Man does, from executing trades to helping pick securities at the firm's discretionary unit, Ellis, the chief executive officer, said in an interview.

 

"If computing power and data generation keep growing at the current rate, then machine learning could be involved in 99 per cent of investment management in 25 years," Ellis said. "It will become ubiquitous in our lives. I don't think that machine learning is the answer to everything we do. It just can make us better at a lot of things that we do."

http://www.smh.com.au/business/markets-liv...205-gzzi70.html

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