Jump to content

Virtual currencies


royco

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 227
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Bitcoin was designed to be cheap, reliable and fast. Lately, though, many users are complaining that the digital currency is anything but.

 

The cost for investors and consumers to buy or sell bitcoin hit an average of $US5 per transaction in early June, the highest rate of its eight-year history as an alternative means of payment. The fee has since come down to about $US3.50. Two years ago, it was less than five US cents.

 

The figures, from data provider BitInfoCharts, show that the growing use of bitcoin, whose total value now exceeds $US40 billion, is stretching the limits of its current market structure. In turn, dealing in bitcoin is becoming more costly and inconvenient, turning off some customers.

 

High fees make it impractical to use bitcoin as a day-to-day currency. Paying a $US5 fee to send $US10,000 bitcoin isnÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢t a big deal, but itÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s hard to justify buying a cup of coffee with bitcoin if the transaction costs more than the coffee.

 

An array of bitcoin applications such as cross-border money transfers and small-ticket consumer payments need an affordable bitcoin network to thrive. With higher fees, ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“I think a lot of use cases start to die,ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ said Jonathan Levin, chief executive of research firm Chainalysis.

 

In recent years, consumers have been showered with rewards for swiping their credit cards ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ from cash back to airline miles and points for free hotel stays. The merchant pays the fee, the consumer gets the spoils.

 

In bitcoinÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s case, the fees are being borne by users.

 

When Cameron Oatley, a 19-year-old student in Romsey, southeast England, recently sent a friend $US30 worth of bitcoin on a U.S. platform, he was hit with a $US6 transaction fee.

 

ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“The whole reason behind bitcoin isnÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢t really there anymore,ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ Mr. Oatley says. ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“Any currency where you have to pay a huge portion of the transaction just for the privilege of using that currency is no currency.ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ÂÂ

 

Bitcoin transactions are processed by a group called ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“miners,ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ who maintain the network and get paid for their work in newly created bitcoin and through transaction fees. Until a few years ago, the fees were an afterthought. But rising activity has changed the math.

 

The increased popularity of the currency has pushed the number of transactions to about 260,000 a day from 100,000 a few years ago. The network however, still can only process about seven transactions a second, which has resulted in bottlenecks.

 

To expedite orders, end users have the option of offering a higher fee as an incentive to miners to process their transactions. The fee you pay can determine how fast you get bitcoin.

 

Eric Piscini, a principal at Deloitte Consulting LLP who specialises in virtual currencies, recently tried to move a small amount of bitcoin without paying a fee. It took two days.

 

ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“ItÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s an issue,ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ says Mr. Piscini. ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“If you want to pay a merchant, either the merchant is taking the risk that the transaction wonÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢t be validated, or he has to wait two days before he gives you the service or product.ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ÂÂ

 

Bitcoin fees also fluctuate with demand; when trading is busier, the fee goes up. Some services like San Francisco-based Coinbase charge customers an average network fee; others allow users to manually set the fee themselves.

 

Rising fees have led the bitcoin community to renew efforts to solve problems with the currencyÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s market structure ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ the so-called ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“scalingÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ stalemate that essentially boils down to how many bitcoins can trade at one time.

 

The question of how to best increase network capacity has long divided the industry. Entrepreneurs, who have built businesses around bitcoin, see the currency as something to be used and exchanged frequently. Miners and developers, meanwhile, tend to see it as an asset to hold, like gold. They fear that increasing limits would make it more expensive to be a miner, driving out smaller miners and leading to a more centralised system.

 

The fight has dragged on for two years. New solutions to the standoff were recently proposed and may be adopted this summer, likely lowering fees. Several other potential breakthroughs, however, have fallen apart in the past.

 

Until the bickering ends, the only way for users to ensure their transactions get processed quickly is to offer miners higher fees. ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“You hope for the best,ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ says Cornell University computer-science professor Emin Gun Sirer.

 

Even though coming changes could alleviate high fees, Mr. Oatley says heÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s done with the digital currency. ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“IÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢m not going to put another cent into bitcoin,ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ he said after selling his remaining stake in early June. ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“There are too many issues.ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ÂÂ

 

Dow Jones Newswires

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The total market capitalisation of all cryptocurrencies is now a bit more than $US100 billion ($132bn), about the same as CBA ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ so, not all that much yet, but growing fast.

 

There are apparently more than 700 of these blockchain seedlings now, sprouting at the rate of about 30 per month through what are called "Initial Coin Offerings". The oldest and largest is bitcoin ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ 42 per cent of the market ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ with ethereum at 30 per cent market share, and gaining.

 

ICOs have overtaken IPOs in both number and popularity among the money-hungry; they have captured the fervour of the tech-spec world, in the same way as dot.com IPOs captured it in the late 1990s.

 

And having watched it for a while, and considered the matter carefully, I think the analogy is apt. That was a bubble then, and this is one now. In fact it's worse: it's a giant scam.

 

Or else it's a sort of global counterfeiting conspiracy, carried out by anarchists intent on bringing down the global system of money and government.

 

And here's another metaphor: it's like the Gold Rush of the 1850s, because then, as now, the fortune hunters were mining money. In the 19th century, gold really was money, directly convertible, and the diggers in Victoria could mine and pan it without too much trouble, or capital.

 

The modern miners of cryptocurrencies use stupid amounts of electricity and are hoping their "coins" become money one day. For the moment they are just tokens for speculating with. Gold and cryptocurrencies have two very appealing things in common: they are truly international, and can't be devalued by governments using inflation as a form of taxation ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ they mostly go up in value instead of down, like money does.

 

But there are also two very big differences: when gold was money, up to 1971, the supply was effectively unlimited and the price was fixed, whereas with bitcoin and ethereum (not sure about the 700 or so other cryptos) the supply is limited and the prices fluctuate.

 

And boy do they fluctuate. Bitcoins were $US7 each five years ago, got as high as $US3000 last month, and are now trading at $US2576... Ethereum's rise has been even more startling (read: crazy), from $US10 a year ago to $US263 now...

 

What do the speculators think they are doing, apart from playing the old "bigger fool" game? They are hoping that the world's governments and central banks take leave of their senses and make cryptocurrencies legal tender. In fact one government ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ Japan ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ has already lost its mind and started to do it.

 

Since the supply of bitcoins and ethers is limited to 21 million and 230 million respectively, for either to become global legal tender ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ so that you could buy a cup of coffee with them in Zagreb or Anchorage ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ they would have to be divided up into millions of smaller units. The more that happened, and the more that small bits of bitcoin or ether were used for transactions, the more each whole unit would be worth.

 

The problem is that money can't have a limited supply, can't be unstable and can't be separated from government and central banking. (At least I think the right word is "can't", but I'm conscious that we used to think that bleeding was the right way to treat sick people, and that you can't have a wire­less phone that you instruct verbally, or a car that drives itself, so "can't" is a dangerous word these days).

 

But money is, in essence, a piece of information that relies on trust. I wave my credit card for a $4 cup of coffee and the barista trusts that she will be able to get $4 worth of something else in return for that piece of data that has appeared in her bank account. The trust comes from the system of legal tender, in which the community, through the government and the central bank, effectively guarantees payment in full ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ $4 for $4.

 

Can the trust bestowed by a blockchain record of a bitcoin's transaction history replace that guarantee? Maybe it can sometime in the future, but I doubt it.

 

And what about the weird mining process, in which algorithms churn through trillions of calculations, burning gigawatts of power. That's no way to run a monetary system, you would think.

 

Mind you, the current system has plenty of flaws. Let's face it: money is created by economists in ..central banks and by licensed banks lending what has been deposited with them, which stays deposited at the same time as being lent, thereby multiplying.

 

Money creation by banks is a privatised demand-driven system that periodically comes unstuck because banks either over-lend, or lend unwisely, so that the money gets lost and the original depositors' savings evaporate ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ although these days most banks are "too big to fail", and therefore implicitly guaranteed by tax­payers.

 

The other problem with the current system is that although the value of money is fairly stable, it tends to devalue over time as a result of deliberate inflation. Central banks have been trying to get inflation up for a decade, in order to reduce the face value of the world's excessive debt.

 

Following the adoption of independent "price stability mandates" by central banks in the 1970s and 1980s, prices have been anything but stable: inflation has averaged 3.5-4 per cent per annum, dramatically reducing the value of money ($1000 40 years ago would now be worth a quarter of that).

 

So those pushing for non-fiat money, that is money not controlled by central bankers and/or politicians, have a point: under the current system, governments debauch the currency for their own purposes and periodically banks blow it up through greed and incompetence. But the people trying to build an alternative system are basically anarchists.

 

In fact, I'd say that global governments will soon need to declare that cryptocurrencies will never become legal tender, and legislate to that effect. You can play with them, and have fun trading and gambling, but actual money? Nah.

 

That's not to say blockchain, the technology behind cryptocurrencies, is also a scam, far from it. In fact, it looks a truly revolutionary technology that is likely to change the world through mass disintermediation ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ but not disintermediation of government.

Alan Kohler is publisher of The Constant Investor.

 

OR

 

At a Credit Suisse private banking conference in .. Singapore, ... Robert Friedland is doing his best to mess with everybody's head. Everything he says makes sense; it just hurts a bit to think about it.

 

"The average American automobile spends 97 per cent of its time stationary," he says. "It is one of the stupidest inventions ever."

 

Here's another: "We have spent a lifetime involved in absolutely basic things: agriculture and mining. Everything in this room is a function of growing it or mining it. But now, everything is going to change in our lifetime."

 

But wait, there's more: "Ninety per cent of existing jobs are going to be replaced by artificial intelligence. None of us will have jobs. We're done."

 

And finally: "Let's hope the good computers win."

 

Friedland is the founder of Canada's Ivanhoe Mines, but was speaking at the global megatrends conference in April this year for his visionary-cum-cynical futurist views. Confronting and somewhat miserable though these thoughts are, Friedland is not just trying to predict the future, but to work out how to get on the right side of it as an investor.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Will Bitcoin Tear Itself Apart?

After two years of largely behind-the-scenes bickering, rival factions of computer whizzes who play key roles in bitcoin's upkeep are poised to adopt two competing software updates at the end of the month. That has raised the possibility that bitcoin will split in two, an unprecedented event that would send shockwaves through the $41 billion market.

 

While both sides have big incentives to reach a consensus, bitcoin's lack of a central authority has made compromise difficult. Even professional traders who've followed the dispute's twists and turns aren't sure how it will all pan out. Their advice: brace for volatility and be ready to act fast once a clear outcome emerges....

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/201...-critical-month
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ethereum Co-Founder Says Crypto Coin Market is a Time-Bomb

 

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/201...cking-time-bomb

Initial coin offerings, a means of crowdfunding for blockchain-technology companies, have caught so much attention that even the co-founder of the ethereum network, where many of these digital coins are built, says it's time for things to cool down in a big way.

 

"People say ICOs are great for ethereum because, look at the price, but it's a ticking time-bomb," Charles Hoskinson, who helped develop ethereum, said in an interview. "There's an over-tokenization of things as companies are issuing tokens when the same tasks can be achieved with existing blockchains. People are blinded by fast and easy money."

 

Firms have raised $1.3 billion this year in digital coin sales, surpassing venture capital funding of blockchain companies and up more than six-fold from the total raised last year, according to Autonomous Research. Ether, the digital currency linked to the ethereum blockchain, surged from around $8 after its ICO at the start of the year to just under $400 last month. It's since dropped by about 60 percent. ....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I personally don't like these cryptocurrencies, however the following is an interesting read and a couple of videos.

 

Bankers Ditch Fat Salaries to Chase Digital Currency Riches

By Lulu Yilun Chen and Camila Russo

July 26, 2017, 7:00 AM GMT+10 July 26, 2017, 10:55 AM GMT+10

Dealmakers and financiers find second wind in cryptocurrency

ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¹Ãƒƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã¢â‚¬Å“ThereÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s so much to imagine,ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ ex-China Renaissance exec says

 

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/201...currency-riches

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

Critical mass, commercial traction and tipping point.

I think the number of wallets, transactions and payment options are reaching these objectives fast after years of lingering.

Many big players seem to think that vc will take its placenin the world as a normal means of transaction and value storage.

 

One big catalyst could be the next gfc global financial crisis.

Vc could prove to be a safe haven.

Maybe not by any objective reason but just because it is a new alternative to more common hedging.

 

In other words if gfc hits vc might surge because many people want it to hedge.

Actually the current uptick could be a precursor to gfc.

And as such the self fulfilling prophecy is happening as we speak.

 

My take is that nobody can afford not to own vc today.

Because it could become a worldwide accepted means of value storage and payment in the future.

The gfc will pass and so will the hedging option but the value storage and payment options will stay and grow.

With the known max amount of vc eg bitcoins it is clear that when the masses know, the will all want it and the value of a vc will rise enormously.

 

I am thinking as an example the value of bitcoin could rise in the 6 digits region over the next 10 years.

Most of us are lucky today that we know about it because most people in the world dont.

Thank you internet and sharescene!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...