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michaelirish

The End of Nuclear Power?  

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Cameco (CCO TSX) (CCJ NYSE) the world's largest uranium producer closed up 3% in Toronto on Friday.CCO announced in December the go ahead for a new mine at Cigar Lake--see below.

 

 

Price of U3O8 in US Dollars

........2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

 

Jan $7.25 $9.70 $10.20 $15.50 $20.70

Feb $7.90 $9.90 $10.20 $16.50

Mar $8.20 $9.90 $10.10 $17.50

Apr $8.60 $9.90 $10.75 $17.60

May $8.90 $9.90 $10.90 $17.85

Jun $8.90 $9.90 $10.90 $18.50

Jul $8.90 $9.85 $10.90 $18.50

Aug $9.10 $9.85 $11.30 $19.25

Sep $9.30 $9.75 $12.20 $20.00

Oct $9.45 $9.90 $12.75 $20.25

Nov $9.50 $9.90 $13.75 $20.50

Dec $9.60 $10.20 $14.50 $20.70

 

Cameco Proceeds with Cigar Lake Mine Construction

Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, December 21, 2004

 

Cameco Corporation announced today that the Cigar Lake joint venture has decided to proceed immediately with construction at the Cigar Lake project. This is the worldÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâ€Â ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¾Ã‚¢ÃƒÆ’ƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’‚¡ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’‚¾ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s second largest, high-grade uranium deposit after McArthur River.

 

Cameco operates Cigar Lake on behalf of a joint venture consisting of Cameco (slightly larger than 50%), COGEMA Resources Inc., a subsidiary of AREVA (37%), Idemitsu Uranium Exploration Canada Ltd. (8%) and TEPCO Resources Inc. (5%). On December 20, 2004, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) announced that it had approved a construction licence for Cigar Lake located about 660 kilometres north of Saskatoon.

 

ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâ€Â ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¾Ã‚¢ÃƒÆ’ƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’‚¡ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’‚¦ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã¢â‚¬Å“We are excited about bringing Cigar Lake uranium into an expanding market that reflects a renewed worldwide interest in nuclear energy,ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâ€Â ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¾Ã‚¢ÃƒÆ’ƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’‚¡ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ said Jerry Grandey, CamecoÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâ€Â ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¾Ã‚¢ÃƒÆ’ƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’‚¡ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’‚¾ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s president and chief executive officer. ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâ€Â ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¾Ã‚¢ÃƒÆ’ƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’‚¡ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’‚¦ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã¢â‚¬Å“After many years of waiting, we are now confident the long-term market fundamentals support our decision to invest in a large uranium development.ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâ€Â ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¾Ã‚¢ÃƒÆ’ƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’‚¡ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ÂÂ

 

This market outlook is shared by a number of CamecoÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâ€Â ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¾Ã‚¢ÃƒÆ’ƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’‚¡ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’‚¾ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s international customers who have entered into longer-term contracts with Cameco for a significant amount of future Cigar Lake production.

 

Cameco anticipates construction will begin early in 2005 and take approximately 27 months to complete. Production could begin in 2007 followed by a rampup period of up to three years before the mine reaches full production of 18 million pounds per year.

 

In making the development decision, the Cigar Lake joint venture approved a construction budget of about $450 million (CamecoÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâ€Â ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¾Ã‚¢ÃƒÆ’ƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’‚¡ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’‚¾ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s share is $225 million) that includes surface and underground facilities at Cigar Lake as well as changes to the milling facilities at McClean Lake and Rabbit Lake. Cameco expects to fund its share of construction costs with operating cash flow and debt.

 

Initially Cigar Lake ore will be processed at the mill located at CogemaÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâ€Â ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¾Ã‚¢ÃƒÆ’ƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’‚¡ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’‚¾ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s McClean Lake operation, 70 kilometres to the northeast. As Cigar Lake production ramps up to full capacity, just over half of final uranium processing will be completed at CamecoÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâ€Â ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¾Ã‚¢ÃƒÆ’ƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’‚¡ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’‚¾ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s Rabbit Lake mill facility, pending regulatory approval.

 

During construction, a maximum of about 350 workers will be employed at the Cigar Lake site. Approximately 250 people will be permanently employed after production begins.

 

The Saskatchewan government recognizes the significant social and economic benefits of this project and has expressed its willingness to encourage new production, such as Cigar Lake, in a fashion similar to what has been done for other resource sectors in the province.

 

The Cigar Lake deposit was discovered in 1981. Test mine development began in 1987 and was completed in 2000. An environmental impact statement was filed with the relevant regulatory authorities in 1995. After a thorough environmental assessment, in April 1998 the federal and provincial governments accepted the recommendations of a joint-review panel and authorized the project to proceed to the regulatory licensing stage. In 2003, a further screening level environmental assessment was required by regulation before construction and operating licences could be issued. In February 2004, the environmental assessment study report was filed and accepted by the CNSC in July 2004 allowing the project to proceed to construction licensing.

 

Cameco, with its head office in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, is the worldÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâ€Â ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¾Ã‚¢ÃƒÆ’ƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’‚¡ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’‚¾ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s largest uranium producer. The companyÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâ€Â ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¾Ã‚¢ÃƒÆ’ƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’‚¡ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’‚¾ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s uranium products are used to generate electricity in nuclear energy plants around the world, providing one of the cleanest sources of energy available today. CamecoÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâ€Â ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¾Ã‚¢ÃƒÆ’ƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’‚¡ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’‚¾ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s shares trade on the Toronto and New York stock exchanges.

 

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

From www.news.com.au

 

 

WA won't support uranium mining

February 15, 2005

From: AAP

WEST Australian Labor will never support uranium mining in the state, Premier Geoff Gallop said today.

 

Dr Gallop was responding after federal Labor leader Kim Beazley gave qualified support to uranium exports to China.

Mr Beazley said he would support such exports but "not without a very firm agreement on all the issues in relation to proliferation".

 

"If all those agreements are put in place then it is a market for us," Mr Beazley told reporters in Perth.

 

Today, Dr Gallop said WA was off limits to uranium mining but exports from existing mines in other states were another question.

 

"There's no way that my government will accept uranium mining in Western Australia," he said.

 

"It doesn't matter who's in power in Canberra, we have a clear policy to have no uranium mining in Western Australia and that's going to be our approach.

 

"My government will work very, very strongly to make sure that policy is upheld."

 

Dr Gallop said the safety of the electorate was at the heart of the policy.

 

 

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France generates about 80% of its electricity in nuclear power stations.The French company AREVA (www.areva.com) builds nuclear power stations and is involved in other areas of the uranium industry.From their website

 

How do different energy sources compare?

To generate 1000 megawatts of electricity (MWe) continuously over a period of one year, only one-sixtieth of FranceÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâ€Â ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¾Ã‚¢ÃƒÆ’ƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’‚¡ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’‚¾ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s annual consumption of electricity one could theoretically use:

- 24 tons of uranium (enriched to about 4% U235)

- 1.7 million tons of oil

- 2.7 million tons of coal

- 2.4 billion cubic meters (m3) of natural gas

- 8.3 million tons of recycled household waste.

All FAQs

 

 

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From www.news.com.au

 

Keen to mine in Kakadu

by Karen Michelmore

February 16, 2005

From: AAP

A FRENCH nuclear power company will soon begin lobbying for permission to mine uranium in world heritage-listed Kakadu National Park.

 

Cogema ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâ€Â ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¾Ã‚¢ÃƒÆ’ƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’‚¡ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“ owned by giant Areva ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâ€Â ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒ¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¾Ã‚¢ÃƒÆ’ƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’‚¡ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’Æâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“ said today it would revive efforts to mine its multi-million-dollar Koongarra deposit once a moratorium ends in April.

Traditional owners, through the Northern Land Council (NLC), imposed the five year moratorium on mining the deposit, 250km east of Darwin.

 

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"When the moratorium finishes in late April we will go into the process, as we normally would, and discuss the matter (with traditional owners)," Cogema Australia general manager Stephen Mann said.

 

"We will apply for the access again."

 

Cogema has attempted to gain access to the deposit numerous times but has been blocked by traditional owners.

 

The future of uranium mining in Kakadu is uncertain, with mining at the Energy Resources of Australia (ERA) Ranger deposit, near Jabiru, expected to wind up sometime after 2008.

 

Earlier this month, ERA left open the door to possible future mining its controversial Jabiluka deposit, on which traditional owners have the right of veto.

 

Mr Mann said Cogema's Koongarra deposit, discovered in 1971, contained around 14,000 tonnes of uranium oxide worth millions of dollars.

 

"I can't be either optimistic or hopeful until we have started discussions," Mr Mann said.

 

The NLC said it was willing to listen to the company, with a decision unlikely until later this year.

 

"Obviously we will be looking at what the company has to talk about as it comes out of moratorium and we will be taking that back ... for consultations with all the traditional owners," NLC chief executive Norman Fry said.

 

"Whether it gets vetoed, whether it goes ahead or whatever, we can't say at this particular point in time because I cannot pre-empt what traditional owners will say."

 

But environmentalists have slammed the move, saying the deposit was in an environmentally sensitive area of Kakadu, near the much-visited Nourlangie Rock.

 

"We will certainly do whatever we can to prevent the mine going ahead, but we will just have to see how it plays out," Northern Territory Environment Centre spokesman Peter Robertson said.

 

Neither the NT Government nor the Federal Government would be drawn on the issue, each saying it was an issue for the other jurisdiction and there were many hurdles for the company to pass before the mining could be considered.

 

"It's not only the uranium issue. I mean, who in their right mind would want to open a big mine next to Nourlangie?" NT Mining Minister Kon Vatskalis said.

 

"What is it going to do for tourism in Kakadu? There are too many things to discuss and many things to actually take care of before you even start digging the first shovel out of the ground."

 

The Federal Government has indicated it supports further development of uranium mining in Australia.

 

However, a spokeswoman for federal Resources Minister Ian Macfarlane said development must meet all the necessary environmental, indigenous, safety and non-proliferation safeguards before it was approved.

 

It was a long process, which included NT Government approvals, with any decision possibly years away, she added.

 

 

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From www.news.com.au

 

Gallop standing alone on uranium

By David King

February 16, 2005

From:

WEST Australian Premier Geoff Gallop has become increasingly isolated within the Labor Party over his opposition to uranium mining.

 

Federal Labor leader Kim Beazley gave cautious support yesterday for the export of yellowcake to China and said guidelines needed to be established for its use.

Mr Beazley said he would support such exports but "not without a very firm agreement on all the issues in relation to proliferation".

 

"If all those agreements are put in place then it is a market for us," Mr Beazley said.

 

The Howard Government announced last year that it would pursue a bilateral agreement with China that could pave the way for uranium exports to the emerging superpower.

 

Federal Labor resources spokesman Martin Ferguson this week backed the Howard Government's efforts to export uranium to China.

 

He said Australia maintained controls to ensure Canberra remained in command of the uranium supply.

 

The Gallop Government opposes the mining of uranium and has declared Western Australia off limits.

 

"There's no way that my Government will accept uranium mining in Western Australia," Dr Gallop said yesterday.

 

"It doesn't matter who's in power in Canberra.

 

"We have a clear policy here to have no uranium mining ... and that's going to be our approach."

 

Dr Gallop said the export of uranium from other states was a separate issue.

 

"The question of whether the uranium comes from some existing mines over East is a separate one," he said.

 

The Gallop Government banned uranium mining in 2002 and has declared its opposition to the uranium fuel cycle.

 

All mining leases issues since 2002 have specifically banned uranium mining, although exploration is still allowed. West Australian Labor cites the safety of workers and the need to store radioactive waste as reasons for its opposition to uranium mining.

 

"Once you export the uranium there's the whole question of the waste," Dr Gallop said.

 

"We've legislated not to have any nuclear waste here in Western Australia.

 

"The pressure will develop for us to have a nuclear waste dump, and I'm totally opposed to it."

 

Western Australia has at least three uranium deposits which could be commercially viable: Rio Tinto's Kintyre deposit in the Pilbara, WMC Resources' Yeelirrie deposit near Leonora and Paladin Resources' Manyingee deposit in the Carnarvon Basin.

 

The West Australian Liberal Party said it would allow uranium mining if it wins the February 26 election, and would look at applications for mining leases on a case-by-case basis.

 

There are three operating uranium mines in Australia: Rio Tinto's Ranger mine in the Northern Territory, WMC's Olympic Dam in South Australia and the Beverley deposit in northeastern South Australia owned by US-based General Atomics.

 

The use of Australia's vast uranium resources has come under the spotlight after Swiss-based mining giant Xstrata launched an $8.4 billion take-over bid for WMC.

 

WMC's Olympic Dam copper and uranium mine contains one-third of the world's known uranium.

 

The price of uranium has soared in the past year.

 

Uranium fetched less than $US7 per pound ($20 per kilogram) in 2001, but spot prices are now about $US21 per pound and are expected to remain high as global stockpiles run down.

 

 

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