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dr_dazmo

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Everything posted by dr_dazmo

  1. Hi All, From 27/7/2021 June 21 Quarterly update: ”To date, SMS and Delta have outfitted twenty (20) B737-NG individual aircraft with CVM kits and are now collecting data to support the current AMOC-approval process within Boeing. Further, Delta Tech Ops - Delta’s key technical and R&D arm - have now formally requested a quotation from SMS to outfit an additional seven (7) aircraft with APB CVM kits that will be included in Delta’s 2022 provisional budget.” With support from both Boeing & Delta, and armed with actual flight data from a large number of aircraft, I’m personally hopeful of FAA approval sooner rather than later.😁 Cheers Dr_Dazmo
  2. Hi All, Pleased to see Rich Poutier on the (very long & extensive) list of attendees at the International Society of Transport Aircraft Trading meeting in San Diego on 6-8 March. With FAA approval in his pocket, I assume it was a fantastic networking opportunity!😁 https://connect.istat.org/Americas/Attendees Cheers Dr_Dazmo
  3. Hi All, Not specifically the CVM STC, but Intelsat (GoGo) installations seem to have recovered nicely, so I assume that additional STCs could be obtained. Hopefully with a more streamlined approval process 😁 https://runwaygirlnetwork.com/2022/03/28/intelsat-makes-aircraft-linefit-gains-secures-inflight-connectivity-wins/ Despite the challenges posed by the COVID-19 crisis in commercial aviation, Intelsat in the last 18 months secured new inflight connectivity orders with airlines covering 720 aircraft, while seeing its 2Ku IFC solution fitted at the factory to new Airbus A220 and A320 family aircraft. Delivery of new 2Ku-fitted Boeing 737 MAXs from the airframer are expected to resume next year. Dr_Dazmo
  4. Hi All, Came across this one as David Piotrowski is a session coordinator (Establishing CBM as a mainstream maintenance practice): 1st International Conference for CBM in Aerospace https://cbmacademy.eu/program/ Cheers Dr_Dazmo
  5. Hi All, Was think recently that it’s interesting that SMN have advised that currently the plan is to focus if the WiFi & APB applications, but relatively recently (May 2020) expressed interest in having CVM approved for Bear Strap inspections: https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2020/05/01/2020-09114/airworthiness-directives-the-boeing-company-airplanes Request To Allow Alternate Inspection Procedure Structural Monitoring Systems PLC (SMS) requested that the FAA allow the use of SMS comparative vacuum monitoring (CVM) structural monitoring sensors (and a CVM nondestructive testing procedure (NDT)) as an alternative to the HFEC inspections of the bear strap. Regardless of the reasoning, it again highlights the long list of potential applications waiting in the wings (pardon the pun 🤣) Cheers Dr_Dazmo
  6. Hi Nipper, I’m not 100% sure, but I think the B757 are International configuration. There would be others, I’m sure 😁 Cheers Dr_Dazmo
  7. Hi All, Unfortunately, I don’t know the specific numbers, but thought this was if interest: “Aside from the A330neo, all of Delta’s internationally configured aircraft still sport Gogo-branded Intelsat Ku-powered onboard Internet.” https://runwaygirlnetwork.com/2022/03/12/delta-is-consistent-but-some-products-showing-their-age/ Again, I don’t have specific numbers, but assume that ALL internationally configured Delta aircraft would be a significant number. Any one have an idea of the number? Cheers Dr_Dazmo
  8. Hi All, This presentation is from 2018, so relatively old, but I like it in that it provides some insight into the number of applications (Delta specific). http://www.smsystems.com.au/wp-content/uploads/smn2018_v2.pdf As the company have said, they are focusing on a couple of specific applications initially, but ultimately there is no shortage of potential for CVM. Cheers Dr_Dazmo
  9. https://jdasolutions.aero/blog/new-detection-tool-should-add-to-aviation-safety-proactive-actions/ Cheers Dr_Dazmo
  10. Another potential (Boeing) CVM application? https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2022/02/25/2022-03968/airworthiness-directives-the-boeing-company-airplanes Background Fatigue damage can occur locally, in small areas or structural design details, or globally, in widespread areas. Multiple-site damage is widespread damage that occurs in a large structural element such as a single rivet line of a lap splice joining two large skin panels. Widespread damage can also occur in multiple elements such as adjacent frames or stringers. Multiple-site damage and multiple-element damage cracks are typically too small initially to be reliably detected with normal inspection methods. Without intervention, these cracks will grow, and eventually compromise the structural integrity of the airplane. This condition is known as WFD. It is associated with general degradation of large areas of structure with similar structural details and stress levels. As an airplane ages, WFD will likely occur, and will certainly occur if the airplane is operated long enough without any intervention. Costs of Compliance The FAA estimates that this AD, if adopted as proposed, would affect 1,187 airplanes of U.S. registry. The FAA estimates the following costs to comply with this proposed AD: Cheers Dr_Dazmo
  11. Hi All, Had a quick look & as of 2021, Delta Airlines had a fleet of 77 Boeing 737-800 in their stable. Their website indicates that all are fitted with Intelsat (GoGo) 2ku wifi. Given the existing relationship between SMS & DAL, I assume these will be the first candidates for CVM installation? Cheers Dr_Dazmo https://www.delta.com/us/en/onboard/inflight-entertainment/onboard-wifi https://simpleflying.com/delta-fleet-2021/amp/
  12. Good to see some significant Director buying (100K) late yesterday. Cheers Dr_Dazmo
  13. Hi Nipper, Haven’t posted for a while, but good to see we’ve finally got the FAA approval. Looking forward to seeing the first of many sales agreements now that Rich has an (approved) product to sell! I was also very pleased to see in the announcement today that “The revenue model goal for SMS remains to provide point-of-sales and to provide licensing agreements for use of the test equipment (PM200).” (To me) this suggests that license payments will be generated each time the sensors are tested - more applications, more testing, more revenue! Cheers Dr_Dazmo
  14. Hi Nipper, Yep, a bit of a roller coaster recently. I’m still under water- it’s all about timing ? Having said that, I’m confident that things are starting to come together & believe that we’ve turned a corner. Lots of volume recently & possibly starting to appear on more radars out there. Cheers Dr_Dazmo
  15. Hi All, Found this Wifi related article: https://paxex.aero/viasat-el-al-wifi-removal/ Thought it might be of interest. Cheers Dr_Dazmo
  16. Sorry Nipper, not sure what the problem is with the link. When I click it opens the article OK.
  17. Hi All, Nothing particularly new in the below link, but good to see some recognition for SHM (and CVM) & that we are #1. ? https://www.google.com.au/amp/s/airwaysmag....-heights/%3famp Cheers Dr_Dazmo
  18. Hi All, Some more relatively recent positive news out of AEM: https://www.google.com.au/amp/s/verticalmag...-program/%3famp Anodyne Electronics Manufacturing Corp. (AEM) has announced they have been awarded certification under Canada’s Controlled Goods Program (CGP). This accreditation will permit AEM to examine, possess, and transfer controlled products and technology that have military or national security significance. Designed to strengthen the defense trade controls in Canada, CGP is a Federal Government program that manages the proliferation of military assets including weapons, satellite GPS systems and communication equipment. As AEM prepares to launch multiple new airborne communication solutions suitable for defense markets, obtaining CGP certification was an important step. “We recognized the controlled goods certification as a need from our customers who engage in highly sensitive projects around the world with government agencies, military, and the like” said Brian Wall, CEO of AEM. “This designation allows AEM to facilitate products and services in these highly regulated sectors.” AEM already provides products, services, and support to the Canadian and US defense industries in various product categories, and their industry-leading equipment can be found on military aircraft across the globe. Participation in CGP will expand AEM’s capabilities and allow them to better support the needs of their growing list of defense customers.AEM expects to be fully compliant with all program requirements and ready to participate in projects with controlled goods requirements at the latest by August 31st, 2021.
  19. Hi All, Saw this & thought it would be of interest: https://www.imeche.org/news/news-article/st...apped-operators Cheers Dr_Dazmo
  20. Hi All, Positive news from SMN today that the POD testing data for the Gogo B737-800 2Ku Wifi STC has been submitted to the FAA. FAA feedback is expected prior to the end of Q2 21 for review of the test data and to return any follow up questions. Cheers Dr_Dazmo
  21. https://people.com/travel/american-airlines...since-pandemic/ American Airlines Says Travel Bookings Have Recovered to 90 Percent of Pre-Pandemic Levels American Airlines is seeing a staggering increase in travel bookings in comparison to its record low numbers throughout 2020 due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. On Monday, the Texas-based air carrier — which lost more than $8.9 billion last year — said in a regulatory filing that net bookings are at 90 percent of the company's pre-pandemic 2019 average, with 80 percent of seats onboard being filled. "Due to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention order to require a negative COVID-19 test for entry into the U.S. at the beginning of 2021, the Company experienced softness in its bookings at the beginning of the first quarter," American Airlines said. "However, as infection and hospitalization rates have materially declined and vaccine distribution has increased during the quarter," the company says it has experienced an increase in bookings. The airline went on to say that it expects the upward trend to continue. Air travel has sharply increased in recent weeks as more Americans get vaccinated. On Sunday, the U.S. Transportation Security Administration (TSA) screened 1.57 billion passengers, the highest number since March 2020, according to Reuters.
  22. Hi All, Thanks to Hatrack over on HC for the below link! https://aviationweek.com/mro/podcast/podcas...itoring-sensors Some of my favourite bits from David Piotrowski - Delta TechOps: "We have a variety of applications in with both Boeing and Airbus, to basically do the same thing for a specific task, use structural health monitoring as an alternate inspection, and with that is going to be a huge savings for our operation." "We literally have dozens of applications across all fleet types. This literally is a stepping stone to wider applications and accelerating the implementation of more efficient maintenance practices." "There are other applications, the 737 aft pressure bulkhead is probably the most likely and we have actually installed sensors on 20 different aircraft and have worked with Boeing on applying for an AMOC (alternative method of compliance to do those inspections. Literally the aft galley is in the way of the inspections. And so when you need to do that inspection, it's a significant burden, it takes three to five days of maintenance and being out of service[/b]. Using the structural health monitoring option, we can route the monitoring lines to a convenient location and l[b]iterally can do it in probably 30 minutes to an hour[/b]." Cheers Dr_Dazmo
  23. Hi All, Saw this in relation to flight cycles & thought it was relevant despite its age (2008). Cheers Dr_Dazmo https://www.airspacemag.com/need-to-know/wh...espan-29533465/ What determines an airplane’s lifespan? Some keep flying for decades, while others end up on the scrap heap By Rebecca Maksel AIRSPACEMAG.COM MARCH 1, 2008 A reader asks: "Two articles in the Feb./Mar. 2007 issue of Air & Space raised a question. One was about the last flying examples of a number of classic planes ("And Then There Was One"). The other was about newer jetliners, too old to fly, being chopped up to make skateboards and soft drink cans ("We Recycle"). It struck me as odd that the old planes are still airworthy, while the jetliners are fit only for the scrap heap. Why can some planes seemingly keep flying forever, while other, newer ones are already used up?" An aircraft's lifespan is measured not in years but in pressurization cycles. Each time an aircraft is pressurized during flight, its fuselage and wings are stressed. Both are made of large, plate-like parts connected with fasteners and rivets, and over time, cracks develop around the fastener holes due to metal fatigue. What determines an airplane’s lifespan? Some keep flying for decades, while others end up on the scrap heap boeing737-631-mar08.jpg A row of 737-800s at Boeing Field in Seattle. (Boeing) By Rebecca Maksel AIRSPACEMAG.COM MARCH 1, 2008 2326 A reader asks: "Two articles in the Feb./Mar. 2007 issue of Air & Space raised a question. One was about the last flying examples of a number of classic planes ("And Then There Was One"). The other was about newer jetliners, too old to fly, being chopped up to make skateboards and soft drink cans ("We Recycle"). It struck me as odd that the old planes are still airworthy, while the jetliners are fit only for the scrap heap. Why can some planes seemingly keep flying forever, while other, newer ones are already used up?" An aircraft's lifespan is measured not in years but in pressurization cycles. Each time an aircraft is pressurized during flight, its fuselage and wings are stressed. Both are made of large, plate-like parts connected with fasteners and rivets, and over time, cracks develop around the fastener holes due to metal fatigue. "Aircraft lifespan is established by the manufacturer," explains the Federal Aviation Administration's John Petrakis, "and is usually based on takeoff and landing cycles. The fuselage is most susceptible to fatigue, but the wings are too, especially on short hauls where an aircraft goes through pressurization cycles every day." Aircraft used on longer flights experience fewer pressurization cycles, and can last more than 20 years. "There are 747s out there that are 25 or 30 years old," says Petrakis. How do airlines determine if metal fatigue has developed in their passenger-liners? Bob Eastin, an FAA specialist on aircraft fatigue, says, "[Airlines] are really relying on the manufacturer's maintenance programs. The manufacturers design the aircraft to be trouble-free for a certain period of time. There are maintenance actions to preclude any catastrophic failures, but that's not to say that the aircraft might not [experience metal fatigue] before those times…. When you get to a certain point [in the aircraft's lifespan], you need to inspect or replace certain parts." Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspections are used both during production (to ensure that components start out free of defects) and during an aircraft's service life to detect cracks as small as 0.04 inch. Inspectors might, for example, take a close look at fastener holes located at the wing and spar junction. We contacted NDE experts Deborah Hopkins of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Guillaume Neau, of Bercli, LLC, who together answered in an e-mail: "The challenge in developing an easier and less expensive inspection strategy is to design a technique that can be used from the skin side (of the wing), that does not require removal of the fastener, and that provides the same or better resolution than the conventional method of removing the fastener." Not having to remove the fastener is a big money-saver. One commonly used method of NDE is ultrasonic phased-array testing, which analyzes the echoes from ultrasonic waves to reveal imperfections inside a material. By using several ultrasonic beams instead of just one, then varying the time delays between the beams, inspectors can look inside a material at different locations and depths, thereby determining the size and shape of any defects. At present, million-dollar robotic inspection systems equipped with phased arrays are being used to inspect wings and composite fuselages for large commercial aircraft and jetfighters before they fly. "Most aircraft manufacturers and service providers—Dassault Aviation, Airbus, and Boeing, for instance—ensure the quality of their production with large-scale non-destructive testing systems," Neau wrote in an e-mail. And while a million dollars may sound like a lot, "when put in perspective, the number is not so large," he says. "If manufacturers discover a problem after assembly, the cost of dismantling and redoing the part or the scrappage waste is much higher than the inspection cost."
  24. Hi All, Potentially good news for SMN (generally). I assume that IF the FAA become more active in inspections (and require more monitoring), etc, Boeing & Operators will be looking for cost saving measures to both minimize the impact of those inspections & ensure that their aircraft remain active service as much as possible. Dr_Dazmo https://finance.yahoo.com/news/analysis-boe...-014031014.html Analysis: New Boeing 787 inspections signal tougher FAA oversight
  25. Aircraft with more than 30,000 cycles (roughly, each cycle may be understood as one flight) must be inspected within seven days, and those with 22,600-29,999 cycles must be inspected within 1,000 cycles, which typically correspond to the number of flights.
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