Jump to content

Cris

Member
  • Posts

    963
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Cris

  1. ASTHMA MEDICATION & DELIVERY DEVICE REVIEW in relation to YOUNG CHILDREN and MARKET POTENTIAL OF FUNHALER ASTHMA SPACER DEVICE (by VISIOMED) BRIEF OVERVIEW OF NON-INHALED ASTHMA MEDICATIONS in relation to YOUNG CHILDREN Monoclonal Antibodies IgE binds to allergens and triggers the release of substances from mast cells that can cause inflammation. When IgE binds to mast cells, a cascade of allergic reaction can begin. Xolair prevents these antibodies from sending messages to the mast cells so those cells never get the signal to release the chemicals that cause the reaction. Drugs in the class of Monoclonal Antibodies: Xolair (Omalizumab) is indicated for adults and adolescents (12 years of age and above) with moderate to severe persistent asthma who have a positive skin test or in vitro reactivity to a perennial aeroallergen and whose symptoms are inadequately controlled with inhaled corticosteroids. Xolair has been shown to decrease the incidence of asthma exacerbations in these patients. Safety and efficacy have not been established in other allergic conditions. - blocks immunoglobulin E (IgE), an underlying cause of allergic asthma symptoms - recommended for those who continue to have asthma symptoms even though they are taking inhaled steroids (but Xolair is not a rescue medication) - clinical studies - 0.5% of patients developed cancer, 0.2% on placebo developed cancer (time frame - less than 1 year) for patients 12 years of age and above http://www.xolair.com/index.jsp http://www.xolair.com/patient/prescribing_info.jsp http://www.xolair.com/index.jsp by INJECTION QUOTE EXAMPLE - MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES by INJECTION from Tanox website Xolaire (Tanox) - subcutaneous use (injection) Prescribing Info - Pediatric Use Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients below the age of 12 have not been established. http://www.gene.com/gene/common/inc/pi/xol...ntraindications Leukotriene Modifiers Leukotriene modifiers are the newest class of drugs for the treatment of asthma. Leukotrienes are chemical compounds that are released during the inflammatory process. They are chemical messengers that help protect the body against attacks by invaders. However, when they are a part of an allergic response, leukotrienes cause airway obstruction through smooth muscle contraction, mucous production, and swelling of the airways. Leukotriene modifiers block the action or production of leukotrienes, and subsequently inhibit the inflammatory process. Two types of leukotreine - based medications have been developed: leukotriene inhibitors that interfere with the actual synthesis of leukotrienes, and leukotriene antagonists that block the action of leukotrienes by interfering with receptor sites. Leukotriene modifiers are good for patients who don't respond well to other anti-inflammatory therapies. They are also finding increasing favor with physicians who treat asthma in children. They are not used to treat acute asthmatic attacks and are available only in tablet form. Drugs in the class of Leukotriene Modifiers: Montelukast - MONTELUKAST (Singulair®) helps to reduce asthma symptoms (coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, or chest tightness) and control your asthma. It does not provide instant relief and cannot be used to treat a sudden asthma attack. It works only when used on a regular basis to help reduce inflammation and prevent asthma attacks. Montelukast is effective in adults and children. This drug is also helpful in improving seasonal allergies, like hay fever. Generic montelukast tablets or chewable tablets are not yet available. Montelukast chewable tablets are normally prescribed in children 2 years of age or older. TABLET BY MOUTH ZAFIRLUKAST (Accolate®) helps to reduce asthma symptoms (coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, or chest tightness) and control your asthma. It does not provide instant relief and cannot be used to treat a sudden asthma attack. It works only when used on a regular basis to help reduce inflammation and prevent asthma attacks. Zafirlukast is effective in adults and older children. Generic zafirlukast tablets are not yet available. Take zafirlukast by mouth (i.e., swallowed) on an empty stomach. Contact your pediatrician or health care professional regarding the use of this medicine in children under the age of 5 years old. Special care may be needed. TABLET BY MOUTH QUOTE EXAMPLE - MONTELUKAST by TABLET SINGULAIR is a prescription medicine approved to help control asthma in adults and children as young as 12 months and to help relieve the symptoms of seasonal allergies in adults and children as young as 2 years. SINGULAIR should NOT be used for the fast relief of acute asthma attacks or to prevent or treat asthma made worse by exercise. You should still have rescue medication available and continue to take your other asthma medications unless your doctor tells you to stop. QUOTE EXAMPLE - ZAFIRLUKAST by TABLET ACCOLATE is a nonsteroidal tablet for the prevention and continuous treatment of asthma in adults and children 5 years of age and older, available only by prescription. ACCOLATE IS NOT FOR USE IN THE REVERSAL OF ACUTE ASTHMA ATTACKS. Common side effects for ACCOLATE included headache, infection and nausea in adults and headache and abdominal pain in children. Oral Beta-2 Agonists Beta-2 agonists work in a manner similar to adrenaline, opening airways and easing breathing. They work by binding with, and thus stimulating, beta-2 receptors that line the cell walls of the lungs and the bronchioles. The effect of the stimulation is to relax smooth muscles and widen the airways. Possible side effects to the Beta-2 agonists include shakiness, rapid heartbeat, and upset stomach. Oral beta2-agonists works in a similar fashion to inhaled beta2-agonists, but they may take longer to work than the inhaled formulation. Oral beta-agonists must be absorbed in the digestive tract and travel through the circulatory system before they begin working in the lungs, whereas the inhaled formulations go straight to the lungs. Drugs in the class Oral Beta-2 Agonists: ALBUTEROL (Proventil®, Ventolin®) is a bronchodilator, a medicine that opens up your air passages and makes you breathe easier. It is a medicine for patients with various lung problems such as asthma and chronic bronchitis. Generic albuterol oral syrup is available.Take albuterol oral syrup by mouth. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Contact your pediatrician or health care professional regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed. SYRUP BY MOUTH ALBUTEROL (Proventil®, Ventolin®) is a bronchodilator, a medicine that opens up your air passages and makes you breathe easier. It is a medicine for patients with various lung problems such as asthma or chronic bronchitis. Generic albuterol tablets and extended-release tablets are available. Contact your pediatrician or health care professional regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed. TABLET BY MOUTH METAPROTERENOL (Alupent®) can open up air passages and make breathing easier for people with various lung problems such as asthma. Generic metaproterenol tablets are available.Contact your pediatrician or health care professional regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed. TABLET BY MOUTH TERBUTALINE (Brethine®) is a bronchodilator, a medicine that opens up your air passages and makes breathing easier. It is a medicine for people with lung problems such as severe asthma and bronchospasm. Generic terbutaline tablets are available. Contact your pediatrician or health care professional regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed. TABLET BY MOUTH QUOTE EXAMPLE - ALBUTEROL by SYRUP Proventil Syrup The usual starting dose for children 6 to 12 years of age is 1 teaspoonful 3 to 4 times a day. The dosage should not exceed 3 teaspoonfuls 4 times a day. For children 2 to 6 years of age, the starting dose is 0.1 milligram per 2.2 pounds of body weight, to a maximum of 4 milligrams, 3 times a day. Special Warnings: The drug has been known to cause life-threatening bronchial spasms, especially with the first dose from a new canister or vial. There have also been rare reports of skin reddening and peeling in children taking albuterol syrup. EXAMPLE OF ALBUTEROL TABLETS Volmax (albuterol sulfate) Extended-Release Tablets Volmax® Extended-Release Tablets are indicated for the relief of bronchospasm in adults and children 6 years of age and older with reversible obstructive airway disease. QUOTE EXAMPLE - METAPROTERENOL by TABLET The usual dose for children between the ages of 4 and 12 is 10 mg (1/2 tablet) 3 times a day. For children over 12 years old the usual dose is 20 mg (1 tablet ) 3 times a day. People taking Alupent® tablets orally may experience a greater incidence of unwanted effects as compared to those taking inhaled Alupent®. http://www.lung.ca/drugs/pages/16.html QUOTE EXAMPLE - TERBUTALINE by TABLET This medication is not recommended for use in children below 12 years of age. EXAMPLE - TERBUTALINE by INJECTION Brethine (injection) Indications and Usage Brethine is indicated for the prevention and reversal of bronchospasm in patients 12 years of age and older with asthma and reversible bronchospasm associated with bronchitis and emphysema. BRIEF OVERVIEW OF INHALED ASTHMA MEDICATIONS & DELIVERY DEVICES in relation to YOUNG CHILDREN Dry Powder Inhalers Because DPIs rely on the force of a person's inhalation in order to properly deliver the medication into the lungs, DPIs are not recommended for children under five, people with severe asthma or those suffering a severe attack. Nebulizers These breathing treatments usually take about 10-15 minutes and are given several times a day. Metered Dose Inhalers (MDI) and Spacers The MDI is a small aerosol canister in a plastic holder which delivers a burst of medication directly to the lungs. The preferred method of using an MDI is by using it with a device called a "spacer." A spacer is a tube that attaches to the inhaler. It holds the medication until you can breathe it in. This makes using the MDI easier and helps deposit the medication into the lungs better. Spacers also come with masks to be used by small children or anyone else that may not be able to breathe in correctly through a standard spacer. Medications delivered by MDI include Aerobid, Alupent, Atrovent, Azmacort, Combivent, Intal, Qvar, Serevent, Tilade and Vanceril. MARKET POTENTIAL OF FUNHALER ASTHMA SPACER DEVICE (by VISIOMED) There are numerous proven, widely-accepted, and widely-used asthma medications delivered by inhalation (including generic versions). Inhaled medications are reliant on efficient inhalation methods to ensure compliance with medication delivery directly to the lungs as intended. Inefficient inhalation (not drawing a deep enough breath) results in inefficient medication. For this reason nebulizers and spacers are recommended as an aid to medicating asthmatic children. A nebulizer is well-suited to aiding medication in children too young to manage a spacer either alone or with carer assistance. A nebulizer is a passive device that does not in itself teach children to inhale deeply, therefore; there remains a very real risk of inefficient inhalation. In addition, this time-consuming delivery method (about 10-15 minutes several times a day) is highly likely to become troublesome, inconvenient, and encounter rising levels of user-resistance. A spacer is well-suited and highly recommended to aid medication in children as soon as they are able to manage its use; either alone or with carer assistance. Whilst standard (unembellished) spacers may be less troublesome and more convenient than a nebulizer, there is still a risk children will not inhale sufficient medication deeply into the lungs. The Funhaler, a children's asthma spacer device was developed specifically to address the above shortcomings and ensure efficient compliance with medication delivery. Effectiveness of the Funhaler has been proven in clinical trials: 1) The Funhaler improved the medication technique of children by 60%. 2) 94% of parents preferred the Funhaler to a conventional spacer device. Asthma is in the news daily and often linked to successful research and drug development news. Whilst all advances are welcome, from this writer's research and perspective, developments appearing in the news are early results requiring further research or further trials and most are years from successful market realisation, therefore; in this writer's opinion the Funhaler is best-suited to aid asthma medication delivery in young children as soon as they are able to manage its use; either individually or with carer assistance. This means the world-wide market potential for the Funhaler from early in 2005 (in this writer's opinion and worth only what you paid for it here), is clearly substantial and protected (by patents). NB Patents secured to protect the Funhaler may provide a basis for additional applications and markets.
  2. Cris

    VSG

    ASTHMA MEDICATION & DELIVERY DEVICE REVIEW in relation to YOUNG CHILDREN and MARKET POTENTIAL OF FUNHALER ASTHMA SPACER DEVICE (by VISIOMED) BRIEF OVERVIEW OF NON-INHALED ASTHMA MEDICATIONS in relation to YOUNG CHILDREN Monoclonal Antibodies IgE binds to allergens and triggers the release of substances from mast cells that can cause inflammation. When IgE binds to mast cells, a cascade of allergic reaction can begin. Xolair prevents these antibodies from sending messages to the mast cells so those cells never get the signal to release the chemicals that cause the reaction. Drugs in the class of Monoclonal Antibodies: Xolair (Omalizumab) is indicated for adults and adolescents (12 years of age and above) with moderate to severe persistent asthma who have a positive skin test or in vitro reactivity to a perennial aeroallergen and whose symptoms are inadequately controlled with inhaled corticosteroids. Xolair has been shown to decrease the incidence of asthma exacerbations in these patients. Safety and efficacy have not been established in other allergic conditions. - blocks immunoglobulin E (IgE), an underlying cause of allergic asthma symptoms - recommended for those who continue to have asthma symptoms even though they are taking inhaled steroids (but Xolair is not a rescue medication) - clinical studies - 0.5% of patients developed cancer, 0.2% on placebo developed cancer (time frame - less than 1 year) for patients 12 years of age and above http://www.xolair.com/index.jsp http://www.xolair.com/patient/prescribing_info.jsp http://www.xolair.com/index.jsp by INJECTION QUOTE EXAMPLE - MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES by INJECTION from Tanox website Xolaire (Tanox) - subcutaneous use (injection) Prescribing Info - Pediatric Use Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients below the age of 12 have not been established. http://www.gene.com/gene/common/inc/pi/xol...ntraindications Leukotriene Modifiers Leukotriene modifiers are the newest class of drugs for the treatment of asthma. Leukotrienes are chemical compounds that are released during the inflammatory process. They are chemical messengers that help protect the body against attacks by invaders. However, when they are a part of an allergic response, leukotrienes cause airway obstruction through smooth muscle contraction, mucous production, and swelling of the airways. Leukotriene modifiers block the action or production of leukotrienes, and subsequently inhibit the inflammatory process. Two types of leukotreine - based medications have been developed: leukotriene inhibitors that interfere with the actual synthesis of leukotrienes, and leukotriene antagonists that block the action of leukotrienes by interfering with receptor sites. Leukotriene modifiers are good for patients who don't respond well to other anti-inflammatory therapies. They are also finding increasing favor with physicians who treat asthma in children. They are not used to treat acute asthmatic attacks and are available only in tablet form. Drugs in the class of Leukotriene Modifiers: Montelukast - MONTELUKAST (Singulair®) helps to reduce asthma symptoms (coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, or chest tightness) and control your asthma. It does not provide instant relief and cannot be used to treat a sudden asthma attack. It works only when used on a regular basis to help reduce inflammation and prevent asthma attacks. Montelukast is effective in adults and children. This drug is also helpful in improving seasonal allergies, like hay fever. Generic montelukast tablets or chewable tablets are not yet available. Montelukast chewable tablets are normally prescribed in children 2 years of age or older. TABLET BY MOUTH ZAFIRLUKAST (Accolate®) helps to reduce asthma symptoms (coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, or chest tightness) and control your asthma. It does not provide instant relief and cannot be used to treat a sudden asthma attack. It works only when used on a regular basis to help reduce inflammation and prevent asthma attacks. Zafirlukast is effective in adults and older children. Generic zafirlukast tablets are not yet available. Take zafirlukast by mouth (i.e., swallowed) on an empty stomach. Contact your pediatrician or health care professional regarding the use of this medicine in children under the age of 5 years old. Special care may be needed. TABLET BY MOUTH QUOTE EXAMPLE - MONTELUKAST by TABLET SINGULAIR is a prescription medicine approved to help control asthma in adults and children as young as 12 months and to help relieve the symptoms of seasonal allergies in adults and children as young as 2 years. SINGULAIR should NOT be used for the fast relief of acute asthma attacks or to prevent or treat asthma made worse by exercise. You should still have rescue medication available and continue to take your other asthma medications unless your doctor tells you to stop. QUOTE EXAMPLE - ZAFIRLUKAST by TABLET ACCOLATE is a nonsteroidal tablet for the prevention and continuous treatment of asthma in adults and children 5 years of age and older, available only by prescription. ACCOLATE IS NOT FOR USE IN THE REVERSAL OF ACUTE ASTHMA ATTACKS. Common side effects for ACCOLATE included headache, infection and nausea in adults and headache and abdominal pain in children. Oral Beta-2 Agonists Beta-2 agonists work in a manner similar to adrenaline, opening airways and easing breathing. They work by binding with, and thus stimulating, beta-2 receptors that line the cell walls of the lungs and the bronchioles. The effect of the stimulation is to relax smooth muscles and widen the airways. Possible side effects to the Beta-2 agonists include shakiness, rapid heartbeat, and upset stomach. Oral beta2-agonists works in a similar fashion to inhaled beta2-agonists, but they may take longer to work than the inhaled formulation. Oral beta-agonists must be absorbed in the digestive tract and travel through the circulatory system before they begin working in the lungs, whereas the inhaled formulations go straight to the lungs. Drugs in the class Oral Beta-2 Agonists: ALBUTEROL (Proventil®, Ventolin®) is a bronchodilator, a medicine that opens up your air passages and makes you breathe easier. It is a medicine for patients with various lung problems such as asthma and chronic bronchitis. Generic albuterol oral syrup is available.Take albuterol oral syrup by mouth. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Contact your pediatrician or health care professional regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed. SYRUP BY MOUTH ALBUTEROL (Proventil®, Ventolin®) is a bronchodilator, a medicine that opens up your air passages and makes you breathe easier. It is a medicine for patients with various lung problems such as asthma or chronic bronchitis. Generic albuterol tablets and extended-release tablets are available. Contact your pediatrician or health care professional regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed. TABLET BY MOUTH METAPROTERENOL (Alupent®) can open up air passages and make breathing easier for people with various lung problems such as asthma. Generic metaproterenol tablets are available.Contact your pediatrician or health care professional regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed. TABLET BY MOUTH TERBUTALINE (Brethine®) is a bronchodilator, a medicine that opens up your air passages and makes breathing easier. It is a medicine for people with lung problems such as severe asthma and bronchospasm. Generic terbutaline tablets are available. Contact your pediatrician or health care professional regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed. TABLET BY MOUTH QUOTE EXAMPLE - ALBUTEROL by SYRUP Proventil Syrup The usual starting dose for children 6 to 12 years of age is 1 teaspoonful 3 to 4 times a day. The dosage should not exceed 3 teaspoonfuls 4 times a day. For children 2 to 6 years of age, the starting dose is 0.1 milligram per 2.2 pounds of body weight, to a maximum of 4 milligrams, 3 times a day. Special Warnings: The drug has been known to cause life-threatening bronchial spasms, especially with the first dose from a new canister or vial. There have also been rare reports of skin reddening and peeling in children taking albuterol syrup. EXAMPLE OF ALBUTEROL TABLETS Volmax (albuterol sulfate) Extended-Release Tablets Volmax® Extended-Release Tablets are indicated for the relief of bronchospasm in adults and children 6 years of age and older with reversible obstructive airway disease. QUOTE EXAMPLE - METAPROTERENOL by TABLET The usual dose for children between the ages of 4 and 12 is 10 mg (1/2 tablet) 3 times a day. For children over 12 years old the usual dose is 20 mg (1 tablet ) 3 times a day. People taking Alupent® tablets orally may experience a greater incidence of unwanted effects as compared to those taking inhaled Alupent®. http://www.lung.ca/drugs/pages/16.html QUOTE EXAMPLE - TERBUTALINE by TABLET This medication is not recommended for use in children below 12 years of age. EXAMPLE - TERBUTALINE by INJECTION Brethine (injection) Indications and Usage Brethine is indicated for the prevention and reversal of bronchospasm in patients 12 years of age and older with asthma and reversible bronchospasm associated with bronchitis and emphysema. BRIEF OVERVIEW OF INHALED ASTHMA MEDICATIONS & DELIVERY DEVICES in relation to YOUNG CHILDREN Dry Powder Inhalers Because DPIs rely on the force of a person's inhalation in order to properly deliver the medication into the lungs, DPIs are not recommended for children under five, people with severe asthma or those suffering a severe attack. Nebulizers These breathing treatments usually take about 10-15 minutes and are given several times a day. Metered Dose Inhalers (MDI) and Spacers The MDI is a small aerosol canister in a plastic holder which delivers a burst of medication directly to the lungs. The preferred method of using an MDI is by using it with a device called a "spacer." A spacer is a tube that attaches to the inhaler. It holds the medication until you can breathe it in. This makes using the MDI easier and helps deposit the medication into the lungs better. Spacers also come with masks to be used by small children or anyone else that may not be able to breathe in correctly through a standard spacer. Medications delivered by MDI include Aerobid, Alupent, Atrovent, Azmacort, Combivent, Intal, Qvar, Serevent, Tilade and Vanceril. MARKET POTENTIAL OF FUNHALER ASTHMA SPACER DEVICE (by VISIOMED) There are numerous proven, widely-accepted, and widely-used asthma medications delivered by inhalation (including generic versions). Inhaled medications are reliant on efficient inhalation methods to ensure compliance with medication delivery directly to the lungs as intended. Inefficient inhalation (not drawing a deep enough breath) results in inefficient medication. For this reason nebulizers and spacers are recommended as an aid to medicating asthmatic children. A nebulizer is well-suited to aiding medication in children too young to manage a spacer either alone or with carer assistance. A nebulizer is a passive device that does not in itself teach children to inhale deeply, therefore; there remains a very real risk of inefficient inhalation. In addition, this time-consuming delivery method (about 10-15 minutes several times a day) is highly likely to become troublesome, inconvenient, and encounter rising levels of user-resistance. A spacer is well-suited and highly recommended to aid medication in children as soon as they are able to manage its use; either alone or with carer assistance. Whilst standard (unembellished) spacers may be less troublesome and more convenient than a nebulizer, there is still a risk children will not inhale sufficient medication deeply into the lungs. The Funhaler, a children's asthma spacer device was developed specifically to address the above shortcomings and ensure efficient compliance with medication delivery. Effectiveness of the Funhaler has been proven in clinical trials: 1) The Funhaler improved the medication technique of children by 60%. 2) 94% of parents preferred the Funhaler to a conventional spacer device. Asthma is in the news daily and often linked to successful research and drug development news. Whilst all advances are welcome, from this writer's research and perspective, developments appearing in the news are early results requiring further research or further trials and most are years from successful market realisation, therefore; in this writer's opinion the Funhaler is best-suited to aid asthma medication delivery in young children as soon as they are able to manage its use; either individually or with carer assistance. This means the world-wide market potential for the Funhaler from early in 2005 (in this writer's opinion and worth only what you paid for it here), is clearly substantial and protected (by patents). NB Patents secured to protect the Funhaler may provide a basis for additional applications and markets.
  3. http://www.ShareScene.com/html/emoticons/weirdsmiley.gif Doh! Kathy, just realised you've already posted 'The Buffalo Theory'. Guess I should have read through first. Thanks for the 'Women v Ladies' chuckle, and thanks to all for the funnies posted here http://www.ShareScene.com/html/emoticons/laughingsmiley.gif . They're a great way to start or end the working day. Cris
  4. Cris

    Membership

    http://www.ShareScene.com/html/emoticons/king.gif Congratulations on the new milestone! ps Whoever did the promo did a great job!
  5. Have a Bonza Christmas and thanks for spending your money at SuperMark One day while visiting with an Aussie friend, Jack says to him: "Mick, my elbow hurts like heck. I guess I better see a doctor while I'm here in Oz." "Maaate .... you don't havta spend that kinda dough," said Mick. "There's a new whizbang computer down at SuperMark. I was actually one of its programmers. It's beaut. You just toss in a urine sample and bob's yer uncle. The computer tells you what's wrong and what to do about it. Takes ten seconds and costs ten dollars ... faster and cheaper than doctors and no bullshit." Jack fills a small jar with a urine sample and takes it to SuperMark. He deposits ten dollars. The computer lights up and asks for the urine sample. Jack pours the sample into the slot and waits. Ten seconds later, the computer ejects a printout: . Maaate! ... you poor bugger, you've got friggin tennis elbow. . Soak it in warm water daily for a couple of weeks and she'll be ace in no time. Have a Bonza Christmas and thanks for spending your dough at SuperMark. That evening, while thinking how amazing this new Australian technology was, Jack began wondering if the computer could be fooled. He mixed some tap-water, a stool sample from Mick's dog, urine samples from his wife and daughter, and some semen into the mixture for good measure. Jack hurried back to SuperMark eager to check the results. He deposited ten dollars, poured in his concoction, and awaited the results. Ten seconds later the computer ejected another printout: . Maaate! ... the tap water's too hard. Tell the missus to use a water softener. . The dog's got ringworm. Piss him off or bath him with anti-fungal shampoo and keep your distance. . Shit! Your daughter's got a flamin drug habit. Whip her into rehab, soon. . Your wife's up the duff. You little ripper she's having twins! Crickey, they're not yours. . The lawyer's gonna cost you a packet. Grab a mate and go get pissed. . Maaate! ... if you don't stop bloody playin with yourself your elbow's never gonna get better. Have a Bonza Christmas and thanks for spending yer last razoo at SuperMark.
  6. http://www.ShareScene.com/html/emoticons/wub.gif Wishing you all a Christmas season filled with the love of family and friends, and a New Year full of hope and joy. Cris http://www.ShareScene.com/html/emoticons/wub.gif
  7. In reply to: kathy on Sunday 05/12/04 07:58pm Another great one Kathy. I'll be sharing it around!
  8. In reply to: floyd on Thursday 02/12/04 09:21am Only in Oz http://www.ShareScene.com/html/emoticons/laughingsmiley.gif
  9. QUOTE (Smartman_plc @ Wednesday 01/12/04 12:48pm) Smartman, Thanks for the candle tip. I'll carry one with me in the car just in case the temperature drops way down to 7 degrees http://www.ShareScene.com/html/emoticons/tongue.gif again next winter. Regards, Cris
  10. Cris

    VSG

    Change of Director's Interest Notice Name of Director Ian Keith Macpherson (Director & Chairman) Date of Change 25.11.04 Number Acquired 500,000 shares Value/Consideration 3.0022 cents per share ($15,011) Nature of Change Acquisition of shares on market No of Securities Held After Change 11,142,521 shares 1,799,892 Options (VSGO) Refer to ASX notice 26.11.04 to clarify/confirm accuracy and obtain further details
  11. Subject: Boyle's Law The following is supposedly an actual question given on University of Washington Chemistry mid-term. The answer by one student was so "profound" that the professor shared it with colleagues, via the Internet, which is, of course, why we now have the pleasure of enjoying it as well. Bonus Question: Is Hell exothermic (gives off heat) or endothermic (absorbs heat)? Most of the students wrote proofs of their beliefs using Boyle's Law (gas cools when it expands and heats when it is compressed) or some variant. One student, however, wrote the following: QUOTE First, we need to know how the mass of Hell is changing in time. So we need to know the rate at which souls are moving into Hell and the rate at which they are leaving. I think that we can safely assume that once a soul gets to Hell, it will not leave. Therefore, no souls are leaving. As for how many souls are entering Hell, let's look at the different Religions that exist in the world today. Most of these religions state that if you are not a member of their religion, you will go to Hell. Since there is more than one of these religions and since people do not belong to more than one religion, we can project that all souls go to Hell. With birth and death rates as they are, we can expect the number of souls in Hell to increase exponentially. Now, we look at the rate of change of the volume in Hell because Boyle's Law states that in order for the temperature and pressure in Hell to stay the same, the volume of Hell has to expand proportionately as souls are added. This gives two possibilities: 1. If Hell is expanding at a slower rate than the rate at which souls enter Hell, then the temperature and pressure in Hell will increase until all Hell breaks loose. 2. If Hell is expanding at a rate faster than the increase of souls in Hell, then the temperature and pressure will drop until Hell freezes over. So which is it? If we accept the postulate given to me by Teresa during my Freshman year that, "it will be a cold day in Hell before I sleep with you†and take into account the fact that I slept with her last night, then number 2 must be true, and thus I am sure that Hell is exothermic and has already frozen over. The corollary of this theory is that since Hell has frozen over, it follows that it is not accepting any more souls and is therefore, extinct... leaving only Heaven thereby proving the existence of a divine being. Which explains why, last night, Teresa kept shouting "Oh my God." THIS STUDENT RECEIVED THE ONLY "A"
  12. Cris

    VSG

    Change of Director's Interest Notice Name of Director Ian Keith Macpherson (Director & Chairman) Date of Change 23.11.04 Number Acquired 500,000 shares Value/Consideration 3.3 cents per share ($16,500) Nature of Change Acquisition of shares on market No of Securities Held After Change 10,642,521 shares 1,799,892 Options (VSGO) Refer to ASX notice 25.11.04 to clarify/confirm accuracy and obtain further details
  13. In reply to: LEGGY on Tuesday 23/11/04 06:44pm Still chuckling http://www.ShareScene.com/html/emoticons/laughingsmiley.gif
  14. In reply to: kathy on Wednesday 17/11/04 01:56pm Hi Kathy, That's a great joke - reminded me of a related cartoon. I've posted the following link to "The Gravy Train" here before but this is for those who haven't seen it. http://thegravy-train.20m.com/work.swf Regards, Cris
  15. In reply to: drarthur on Monday 15/11/04 08:54pm Drarthur, Was that the year 2001 or 1901?
  16. Cris

    WAL

    In reply to: Alastor on Monday 15/11/04 03:29pm It's OK Alastor. We don't need to be protected from whatever it is you're hinting http://www.ShareScene.com/html/emoticons/wink.gif .
  17. Cris

    WAL

    In reply to: mrmiyagi on Monday 15/11/04 11:08am I think level of interest will depend on announcement re replacement for John Thompson. Regards, Cris
  18. Stem Cells Reverse Damage of Heart Attacks Robert Preidt TUESDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDayNews) -- Stem cells can be used to treat heart attacks in pigs, says a study by researchers at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. If further research with animals and humans proves equally successful, this method could offer a new way to repair and reverse heart muscle damage in heart attack patients, the researchers said. In the study, the Johns Hopkins team took stem cells from seven adult pigs' bone marrow and injected them into the damaged hearts of seven other adult pigs. The stem cells restored the pigs' heart functions to their original condition within about two months. "Current treatments for cardiovascular disease prevent heart attack from occurring and/or alleviate its after-effects, but they do not repair the damaged muscle that results, leaving sizably dead portions of heart tissue that lead to dangerous scars in the heart," study author Dr. Joshua Hare, a professor of medicine, said in a prepared statement. "Damage done by heart attack to heart muscle is really the cause of all the serious complications of the disease: disturbance of heart rhythm can lead to sudden cardiac death and decreased muscle pumping function can lead to congestive heart failure," study co-author Dr. Alan Heldman, an interventional cardiologist and assistant professor of medicine, said in a statement. "Our aim is to find a way to repair the damage done to the heart muscle and prevent these complications," Heldman said. The study was presented Tuesday at the American Heart Association's annual meeting in New Orleans. More information The American Heart Association has more about heart attack. http://www.forbes.com/lifestyle/health/fee...cout522227.html
  19. Source: University Of Southern California Date: 2004-11-11 X-rays Reveal Details Of Cancer Protein A USC scientist has captured the first-ever views of a potent cancer protein in action, revealing new details about how it works. The series of high-resolution “snapshots†of the tumor-causing protein may lead to new insights into how viruses cause cancers, said Xiaojiang Chen, an associate professor of biological sciences in the USC College of Letters, Arts and Sciences. The protein, called “large T†antigen, comes from the SV40 virus, which causes tumors in monkeys. In the lab, the viral protein can transform healthy cells into cancerous ones. But scientists have long been puzzled about how the large T accomplishes this and other key functions. Working with the cell’s own proteins, large T turns into a “molecular machine†that transforms the energy from the cellular fuel molecule ATP into mechanical work. Reporting in the Oct. 1 issue of the journal Cell, Chen and his team offered the first play-by-play, atomic-level images of the protein as it unzips and unwinds the double helix of DNA so that genetic material can be copied. “The saying goes, ‘A picture is worth a thousand words.’ In this case, it’s really true,†Chen said. Using a technique called X-ray crystallography, Chen and his team determined the various 3-D structures of large T as it interacts with the fuel molecule and changes shape in response. Putting these snapshots together, the team was able to visualize how the ring-shaped protein machine moves, separating and actively pumping DNA strands into its center. The new report follows up on a key discovery the team made in 2003, when it became the first to describe the long-sought, static 3-D structure of large T, a task made difficult because of the protein’s size and complexity. Chen’s recent work further elucidates one of the most critical moments in the life of a cell – the copying of its genetic material – that eventually leads to the division of a cell into two daughter cells. This same moment also marks a focal point for cancer researchers intent on finding out how a healthy cell turns malignant. In lab animals, the SV40 virus has long been known to cause cancers of the brain, bones, chest and lymphatic system. More recently, scientists have found DNA signatures of the SV40 virus in tumors from people with these same types of cancer. While scientists continue to debate whether the virus caused the human cancers, the data are highly suggestive of a link, Chen said. Although human exposure to SV40 is rare, many were accidentally exposed to the virus through contaminated polio vaccines administered in the 1960s in the U.S. Some suspect that in the former Soviet Union, contaminated vaccine was used as late as the 1980s. The new finding provides valuable information for designing drugs that will block the infection of tumor viruses like SV40, as well as the related human papilloma virus, which causes cervical cancer, Chen said. “The better we understand protein structure and function,†Chen said, “the better we can get at identifying anti-viral and anti-cancer drug targets.†said Chen, who has been busy setting up a new X-ray crystallography facility at the college. What’s more, large T antigen’s similarities to proteins that initiate DNA copying in human cells have made it a powerful model for molecular biologists. Chen’s new description of how large T works as a molecular machine – its parts “move in unison, like a jellyfish moves in the water†– has already altered expectations about how its human counterparts may work. “Once you have the structure of a protein, if you really know how the parts come together and how they move,†Chen said, “you can find out a lot about what the protein does and how it does it. It’s a very direct way to study function.†Editor's Note: The original news release can be found http://www.usc.edu/uscnews/story.php?id=10715
  20. Public release date: 11-Nov-2004 Contact: Margaret McFall-Ngai mjmcfallngai@wisc.edu 608-262-2393 University of Wisconsin-Madison In a tiny squid, bacterial toxin governs organ development MADISON - In a tiny Pacific Ocean squid, a toxic molecule that causes whooping cough and gonorrhea in humans has been found to be a critical catalyst for organ development. The toxin, produced by different types of bacteria in different hosts, is known as tracheal cytotoxin. And the astonishing discovery that it can be either good or bad - depending on its biological context - promises to rattle long-held perceptions of microbes and their role as pathogens. The new work, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was reported this week (Nov. 12) in the journal Science. That the same toxic molecule produced by different bacteria in different host animals plays such disparate roles - disease and massive tissue damage on the one hand, and critical organ development on the other - may force biologists to rethink the relationship between the world's many microorganisms and their host plants and animals, according to Margaret McFall-Ngai, a University of Wisconsin-Madison professor of medical microbiology and the corresponding author of the Science paper. "It is all context dependent," says McFall-Ngai. "It has to be that we have mechanisms to use these molecules in different ways. Until now, molecules of a virulent nature have not been recognized as having essential roles in development." In the diminutive Hawaiian bobtail squid, the toxin was found to spur the development of a structure, a light-producing organ that acts as a sort of "Klingon cloaking device," mimicking starlight to confuse hungry predators lurking in the depths. In humans, the same toxic molecule, produced by different species of bacteria, causes massive tissue damage in the lungs in the case of whooping cough, and in the fallopian tubes in the case of gonorrhea. When the squid are born, they are about half the size of a grain of rice, and they must acquire the toxin-producing bacteria from their ocean environment. Specialized features on the surface of the squid's nascent light organ facilitate colonization by the bacteria, which, in turn, promote the development of the functioning light organ. "If you deprive the animal of those microbes, the system doesn't develop," McFall-Ngai says. This critical symbiotic relationship, the Wisconsin scientist points out, almost certainly arose within the grand scheme of evolution where "all animals arose in the microbial soup of the ocean. In that context," she notes, "animals could develop a set of body plans that repel bacteria or associate with them." In people, it is estimated that there are no fewer than 2,300 different kinds of bacteria that live in either beneficial or benign harmony with their human hosts. Many of those live in the gut and help with critical processes, such as digestion and the provision of certain vitamins. Also, the bacterial partners that normally occur with the healthy human are critical for the development of the immune system. There is evidence, for example, that their influence is responsible for suppressing autoimmune disease and allergies. In contrast, there are probably no more than 100 species of bacteria that cause serious illness in humans. The implications that humans are awash in benign and beneficial microbes raises new concerns about the overuse of antibiotics, and suggests that medical science - with its emphasis on studies of pathogenic bacteria - is overlooking a vast biological domain that may have an important influence on human health and well-being. "We're walking ecosystems. We've known that," says McFall-Ngai. "What's new is how many there are and how much we rely on them." According to McFall-Ngai, it may be that the molecular crosstalk between bacteria and their host organisms determines whether or not the relationship is beneficial, neutral or harmful. Communication between the host and the bacteria that depend on the host, apparently, can be either "civil conversation or a shouting match," depending on the biological context that has developed as the two organisms evolved together. "We don't understand if beneficial associations or pathogenic associations result from the same language," McFall-Ngai notes. "The surprise of this study is that the molecules used to signal development of the organ in the squid are the same that signal for pathogenesis in the case of whooping cough or gonorrhea." McFall-Ngai argues that the new finding should be cause for yet more caution in the administration of antibiotics. The ability of pathogenic microbes to acquire resistance to commonly used antibiotics has been the primary concern. But because the agents kill microbes indiscriminately, microorganisms that play important roles within their human hosts also are at risk. From a scientific perspective, the new findings may encourage researchers to begin to pay more attention to the many microbes that live in association with humans. The advent of new genetic sequencing technology is permitting biologists to begin to identify the many varieties of bacteria that live in association with humans and other animals. In addition to McFall-Ngai, authors of the Science paper include Tanya A. Koropatnick of the University of Hawaii, Jacquelyn T. Engle and William E. Goldman of the Washington University School of Medicine, Michael A. Apicella of the University of Iowa and Eric V. Stabb of the University of Georgia. http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/200...w-iat110904.php
  21. Posted on Sun, Nov. 14, 2004 Encinitas student takes top prize in regional science contest Associated Press BERKELEY, Calif. - A 17-year-old San Diego County student who developed a prototype for a device that transfers the energy from ocean waves into electricity won the chance Saturday to compete in a prestigious national science competition . Aaron Goldin, a senior at San Dieguito High School Academy in Encinitas, Calif., placed first in the western regional finals of the Siemens Westinghouse Competition in Math, Science & Technology. The title of Goldin's project itself is a mouthful - "Autonomous Gyroscopic Ocean Wave Powered Generator: Invention of a New Energy Wave Conversion Technology." But he created his invention in his garage, using old tape recorders and cast-off household appliances for parts. Despite its humble origins, the gyroscope-powered generator was praised as a model of "elegance and simplicity" by Roger Falcone, a physics professor at the University of California, Berkeley. "This young man made not just an incremental advance in a critically important field, but a truly original invention," Falcone said. Goldin said that in developing the device he paired his longtime concern for the environment with his lifelong love of tinkering. "I've always been concerned about how energy has been produced and how it affects the planet and its effect on the ecosystems and ultimately how it will affect our ability to live on this planet," he said. "I've always liked building things and taking them apart." As the silver medal winner in the individual category, Goldin was awarded a $3,000 college scholarship and the right to compete in the national Siemens Westinghouse Competition, to be held Dec. 3-6 in Washington, D.C. The grand prize for the national contest is a $100,000 scholarship Two seniors at Highland High School in Palmdale, Calif., Steve Frehn and Andrew Deagon, shared the top team honors with their research on improving the efficiency of electrically powered artificial muscles. The pair were awarded a $6,000 scholarship to split and can also advance to Washington for next month's national competition, one of the most prestigious science competitions for high school students in the United States. A panel of judges from the University of California, Berkeley chose all the winners. ON THE NET www.siemens-foundation.org http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews...10177191.htm?1c
  22. Wednesday, November 10, 2004 10:56 PM Inventor to Malacañang: Pls. release records of my invention By JOJO DUE TODAY Reporter ANGELES CITY - The inventor of a fuel-saving and emission-reducing device, whom President Arroyo presented with the Most Outstanding Invention Award last year, has asked Malacanang to release the records of his invention to help ease the country’s economic crisis besides letting the world know that a solution to the pollution problem can be found in the country. Pablo Planas, 67, inventor of the Khaos Super Turbo Charger, said his fuel-saving and emission-reducing device would help the country’s economy if the President releases the records of his invention, which dates to as far back as 1973. Planas claimed that the records showing the effectiveness of his device at controlling emission, improving engine performance and reducing fuel consumption are stored in Malacañang since President Marcos’s time. The inventor from San Juan, Metro Manila, said he joined an international competition in the country in 1974. It was participated in by 27 foreign and 17 local inventors. The committee in charge of the competition was composed of then Defense Minister Juan Ponce Enrile, Energy Minister Geronimo Velasco and Public Works Minister Alfredo Juinio. Planas won the competition, but the records of his invention were not released. “I want the people to know that the solution to the pollution problem in the world could possibly be found in the Philippines through this device, as it cuts harmful emissions caused by unburned fuel. It would also help the economy as it saves fuel and improves engine performance that would cut spending, both for consumers and the government,†he said. Costing P6,500 each, the Khaos Super Turbo Charger took Planas several months of experimentation and a few more months to build the prototype, which he said was the one entered into the international competition. Planas claims that the device can help vehicle owners cut down fuel consumption by 15 to 50 percent. He further claims that his invention reduces emissions by 99 percent and that it would take only 15 minutes to install the device if the engine being fitted is in good condition. These benefits are further boosted by the fact that the device can be used, as Planas claimed, for a lifetime and needs only water and soap to clean. It comes with a cheap scrubbing pad filter that can either be cleaned or replaced by the owner. Planas filed for a patent at the Intellectual Property Office (IPO) first in 1974. Subsequent improvements, however, led to three more applications for patents in 1978, 1985 and 1997. He has now filed for an international patent with the help of the IPO. Several government officials have tested the device and he said they had all been witnesses to its effectiveness. Officials include Environment Secretary Michael Defensor, who he claimed saw a zero-emission result, and Energy Secretary Vince Perez Jr. He further said that officials of the Land Transportation Office (LTO), whom he met with a few months ago, have endorsed his turbo-charger device. Planas explained that emissions are caused by carbon deposits in spark plugs that prevent the proper combustion of fuel, particularly when the vehicle is running idle, resulting in unburned fuel that contribute to pollution-causing emissions. “The Khaos Super Turbo Charger adds air during the combustion process during idling that provides the ideal air-gas mixture and burns fuel efficiently. This not only saves fuel but also reduces emissions caused by unburned fuel and at the same time improves engine performance,†he said. He said he had been offered at least $100 million by US-based firms who want to buy his invention but that he refused all of them as he wants the world to know that the solution to the more than 120-year-old pollution problem could possibly be found in the Philippines. “Of course I would want to sell the device worldwide to help reduce pollution, which has created problems for our planet. But I would want the world to know that it came from the Philippines and this would help the economy through its earnings,†he said. http://www.abs-cbnnews.com/NewsStory.aspx?...ncial&OID=63163
  23. QUOTE (nifty49 @ Friday 12/11/04 06:48pm) http://www.ShareScene.com/html/emoticons/laughingsmiley.gif Loved it!
×
×
  • Create New...